SHOW FILTERS
77

Flowers Wedding Ideas

  • Photos By: Chelsea Fuss

    If you've always dreamt of carrying a bouquet of old fashioned garden roses down the aisle, but your budget doesn't quite match up to the dream, try this version!

    Materials: 24 stems of spray roses (It works best if you buy one bunch with buds and one bunch with open blossoms) Order them ahead of time to secure your favorite color! Garden clippers String or twine florist tape 1-2 yards of ribbon

    Directions: 

    First, pick off the brown petals from the blossoms. We used spray roses, one of the most inexpensive roses on the market, to create this bouquet.     "Edit" each stem. Spray roses have several blossoms on each stem. Clip 1-2 off each stem to leave the prettiest blossoms and the stems that are around the same level on the stem. Also, remove the leaves from these stems.     Take a few of the stems with nice leaves and clip off all the blossoms. Wash the leaves. Leave 1-2 branches of leaves on the stem. Make sure none of the leaves are too low on the stem or it will interfere with the "handle" of your bouquet. Be sure to choose leaves that are hydrated and feel firm.     Spray roses consist of 3-5 smaller blossoms on each stem, and have a more casual feel then your normal florists' roses. They are readily available at markets and florists all year.     Gather a few stems in one hand at a 45 degree angle. Each time you add a stem, turn your bouquet. Don't be afraid to place some blossoms higher than others. This gives your bouquet depth and interest.     Be sure to add leaves in as you go. These frame the blossoms and give the bouquet a natural feel. Tie with twine, cover in florist tape (to protect the ribbon) and tie up with a ribbon.     By deconstructing the spray roses, you can create a bouquet that looks very natural. Your guests will never guess that your flowers came from the local grocery!     The total cost of this bouquet: $12 + ribbon!     Enjoy your beautiful, garden bouquet!
    12
  • Photo By Chelsea Fuss

    This centerpiece is stunning - mainly because of the vibrant blooms!      Materials: 10 red, white and pink anemones  5 mini daffodils 8 orange, red, and white ranunculus (better if blown open) Ranunculus greens and buds English daisies in pink and white (cut from 2 plants) Modern vase Rocks Chicken wire or a flower frog Clippers

    Directions:

    First, fill the vase with rocks half way up the vase. Fill with water. Start filling the vase with stems. The rocks will keep the flowers in place and help you create the shape of your flower arrangement.     Try to create an "s" shape with greens and lighter flowers cascading to the right and diagonally across at the bottom of the vase.     Place larger blossoms at the bottom of the arrangement and lighter smaller buds and greens towards the top.     We added a table number made from a simple number sticker purchased at a grocery/drygoods store...     ... and a painted horse for some humor!     Tip: To make this arrangement more budget friendly, substitute more greens for flowers. The recipe is made of spring flowers. For a summer or fall version substitute with: dahlias (the single petaled varieties would work great), iceland poppies, garden roses, peonies, california poppies, daisies, roses.   Photo By Chelsea Fuss
    6
  • Photos By Chelsea Fuss

      Materials: Four bunches of daffodils: use different colors and flowers that are at different stages. The paperwhite daffodil, "Grand Soleil d'Or" has small petals and gives the bouquet the wild feel. String Scissors and/or clippers Suslin or cotton     Directions: 1. Remove the leaves from the daffodils and separate the flowers and leaves into piles.     2. Grab a few stems of flowers and hold in your left hand if you are right-handed and right hand if you are left-handed.     3. Alternate, adding flowers and leaves. Each time you add another bunch, turn the bouquet.   4. Once you like how it looks, trim the stems and tie the bouquet together with a string.     5. Cut into a piece of cotton muslin just an inch and then tear a 1" x 12" long piece.   6. Tie the bouquet together with the cotton.     Tip: Daffodils don't like to have their stems cut a lot and will exude a sticky substance. Try to just cut them once and keep them in a cold, dark place until ready for use.     Photos By Chelsea Fuss
    3
  • Project and Photos By: Victoria Hudgins

    The latte bowl is having a wonderful design moment this year. Coming out at every store in the most beautiful hues, textures and styles. Grab a stack of coordinating bowls and bunches of your favorite flowers to finish off reception tables with a beautiful touch.     Using latte bowls as centerpieces gives a gorgeous presentation to flowers, allows you to use fewer stems (which saves money!) and they are low enough to allow guests to see each other and chat across the table.    1. Collect anywhere from 1-3 bowls per table in coordinating colors and designs. Place a small floral ball in water to soak for hours before putting the centerpieces together. You will need to make these on the day of your event, so enlist the help of a good friend to do the final put together and placement.     2. Carefully poke 3-4 stems of your favorite fully-blooming flowers into the balls.     3. Mist to keep florals alert just before table placement.       Project and Photos By: Victoria Hudgins
    8
  • Project and Photos By: Chelsea Fuss

    Instead of corsages, consider giving the mothers of the wedding party small bouquets to carry. No need to worry about pinning on finicky corsages, let them carry these sweet bouquets instead.     You will need: Around 10 stems of flowers including 3 large open blossoms, 1 stem of greenery, 1 stem of filler, and a mix of budded and open flowers in different shapes and sizes. Pictured: 2 parrott tulips, 2 stems of ranunculus, 2 stems of mimosa, 3 stems muscari, 1 stem hyacinth.   Other flowers that work well: roses, lisianthus, astiilbe, queen anne's lace, lily of the valley, and herbs.   Finally, you'll need string, scissors, clippers, ribbon and a vase to hold bouquets.     Directions: 1. Strip most of the leaves off the flowers and cut the stems around 6 inches short.     2. Hold a few of the flowers in one hand and add flowers and greenery with the other hand, until the bouquet looks about right.     3. Tie with a string.     4. Trim the stems about 4 inches long.     5. Tie with a ribbon.      6. Keep in vase with a label until the event or photos begin!   Tip: When arranging the flowers, remember you can balance out one large flower with 3 smaller flowers. Another idea is to keep the larger, open flowers towards the bottom and the lighter flowers and buds towards the top of the bouquet.     The mothers in your wedding party will love carrying these sweet nosegays and can enjoy them for about a week after the wedding!        Aren't they stunning?     Project and Photos By: Chelsea Fuss  
    3
  • Project and Photos By: Brittni Mehlhoff 

    These floral minis are a sweet and unique way to incorporate fresh flowers into your reception décor.

    They're fairly easy to make and can double as favors. Imagine how pretty they'd be situated on top of each place setting!

    Supplies:

    Scissors Floral foam  Small vessel or decorative bowl One large bowl filled with water Hydrangeas and other fresh flowers with small to medium size blooms

    Step One: Cut down a piece of floral foam to fit snug inside the vessel or small, decorative bowl.     Step Two: Once the foam has been cut to size, drop it into a large bowl of water and let it sink to the bottom. After letting it soak for about a minute, place it back into the small vessel, and begin cutting down your fresh flowers. Each stem should be cut at a sharp angle to ensure it can pierce through the foam.     Step Three: Starting in the center and working your way out, begin adding short stems of hydrangea clusters to the arrangement.     Step Four: Once the entire bowl is filled, add additional flowers and fillers. Depending on where they are placed, some stems will need to be slightly longer than others. Add finishing touches with your favorite blooms and fill areas that look sparse.     Styling Tip: When the seasons change, so does floral availability. Just remember, hydrangeas are a key factor for keeping this project simple. The stems are nice and hearty and hold the surrounding florals in place.     These miniature arrangements can also be displayed on a place card table with paper flag table numbers or dispersed with small votive candles along the center of a long banquet table.    

     

    13
  • Photos By: Chelsea Fuss

    We love this refreshing take on the potted plant! Take a 4” blooming plant and wrap it in newspaper and twine for an earthy but unique wedding favor or centerpiece. Here’s the how-to!

    You'll need: 

    4” seasonal blooming plants. 1/4 of a page of newspaper for each plant. We used the French newspaper, Le Monde Diplomatique for it’s heavy, shiny quality (and the romantic wording!) but you could use any newspaper that has significance (in date or language) to you as a couple. Scissors. Waxed twine.     Directions: Cut a 1/4 of newspaper page for each plant.     Take the center ends and turn them up towards the plant and flat against the pot. Wrap the sides over and fold. Tie with waxed twine.     The pots can be set out as favors or they can double as centerpieces by being displayed down the center of a family style table.     How sweet is this place card?     Use the blooms as a guide for your color scheme by displaying them on pretty matching fabric or with coordinating napkins.     We used violas, but other options include daffodils or hyacinth for spring, miniature marigold or daisies for summer, chrysanthemums or pansies for fall, tulip or paperwhites for winter.     Tip: Make sure the bottoms of the plants are dry or the newspaper will get wet. You can also include a small piece of cellophane under the pot or line the newspaper so that you can water the plants.     Your guests will love this bright, seasonal decoration and they’ll be happy to take them off your hands at the end of the evening.    

     

    2
  • Photos By: Mary Swenson

    Wrist corsages are a pretty and very budget-friendly alternative to bouquets for your bridal party, and are easy to make yourself in just a few steps! 

    Start by selecting ribbon for your corsages. The color, width, and fabric possibilities for ribbon are absolutely endless, but be sure to choose one that's at least an inch wide to carry the weight of flowers. We chose inch and a half satin ribbon for our project.     Cut each ribbon to a length long enough to fit around a wrist, with a few inches extra to trail down after the bow is tied. Then, cut a small hole in the middle of the ribbon and cut the ends at an angle for a finished look.     Choose a few simple flowers in complimentary colors that work well together in a small bunch. Three blooms tend to work best for a wrist corsage; or, go with a single large bloom for a simple and modern look.     Cut the flowers close the the base, and take a piece floral wire and bend it into a hairpin shape. You will need one piece of wire in this shape for each flower in your corsage.     Stick the wire into the center of each flower and push it through the flower, so that each wire comes out on either side of the stem.     If you're using multiple flowers for your corsage, form them into a small bouquet and twist the wires together. Starting at the underside of the flower, wrap the wires together with floral tape. If you're using a single bloom, simply wrap the wire on that bloom with floral tape.

    Stick your flowers through the hole in your ribbon.

    Use fabric glue to glue the tape-covered wire stems to the underside of the fabric and allow to dry completely.     The lovely finished product -- a beautiful, wearable alternative to a bouquet, at a fraction of the cost!  

     

    4
  • Project and Photos By: Chelsea Fuss

    It's your wedding day, so carry the bouquet you love. This recipe is for a pretty, fragrant garden rose bouquet, that you can make yourself! We've shared some insiders florists's tips to help you along the way. The total cost was around $50!     Flower Recipe: 6 garden roses (ask your florist for David Austin or old garden roses and they can help you) 1 bunch of spray roses 2 stems of rice flower 1 stem of fern clippers scissors twill ribbon twine   Step One: Start by trimming up all of the flowers. Remove most of the leaves and extra branches from the stems. Remember, you can save these and make small flower girl bouquets from them like florists do. Save any stems that are more than 2 inches to do so.     Step Two: De-thorn your roses by taking a towel and running it down the stem of the roses with a little bit of strength. This is a florist's trick!     Step Three: Cut all of the stems at an angle and let them soak in lukewarm water. If you have any roses that are closed, you can put them in a warm place so that they open up, but do keep them away from direct sunlight. Garden roses open up fairly quickly so you'll actually want them just open midway when you start to arrange the bouquet. Once you start working with them, the roses will continue opening because they'll be warm from your hands.     Step Four: Start with a few of the larger garden roses, grouped loosely together. Hold the bouquet in the same hand while making it and add flowers in with your other hand. Turn the bouquet each time you add flowers.     Step Five: Next, add spray roses to fill in between the garden roses. Be sure to keep the garden roses mostly grouped together, eventually you'll fill the other side with spray roses, rice flower and fern.     Step Six: Add in the rice flower between the clusters of spray roses.     Step Seven: Add the fern to that same side of the bouquet to balance the large garden roses.     Step Eight: Secure the bouquet with twine, trim the stems, and cover the twine with twill ribbon.     Store the bouquet in water, in a cool place until ready for use.    
    9
  • Project and Photos By: Chelsea Fuss

    For the bride who loves the seaside, tradition, and classic, clean lines, this might be just the right bouquet! It's easy to make and costs around $45. Another great thing about this recipe is that the flowers are available year round!     Supplies: flower clippers twine scissors ribbon bucket with water vase full-length mirror   Flower Recipe: 5 open white roses (make sure they aren't all the way open because they will open quickly once the bouquet is made). 8 white hydrangeas     Step One: Remove the leaves from the roses and the lower leaves from the hydrangeas. Keep the leaves at the top of the hydrangea stems as they will help frame the bouquet.     Step Two: Gather three hydrangeas in one hand (tip: in the left hand if you are right-handed or vice versa).     Step Three: Add a group of roses, each stem at varying heights. Fill in the holes with hydrangeas.     Step Four: Hold the bouquet in front of you and look in a full-length mirror to make sure that the shape is how you like it. Make any adjustments and tie with twine.     Step Five: Clip the stems short.     Keep in a vase in a fridge (away from fruit and food) and add the ribbon a few hours before your ceremony!  
    7
  • Photos By: Chelsea Fuss

    If you've always dreamt of carrying a bouquet of old fashioned garden roses down the aisle, but your budget doesn't quite match up to the dream, try this version!

    Materials: 24 stems of spray roses (It works best if you buy one bunch with buds and one bunch with open blossoms) Order them ahead of time to secure your favorite color! Garden clippers String or twine florist tape 1-2 yards of ribbon

    Directions: 

    First, pick off the brown petals from the blossoms. We used spray roses, one of the most inexpensive roses on the market, to create this bouquet.     "Edit" each stem. Spray roses have several blossoms on each stem. Clip 1-2 off each stem to leave the prettiest blossoms and the stems that are around the same level on the stem. Also, remove the leaves from these stems.     Take a few of the stems with nice leaves and clip off all the blossoms. Wash the leaves. Leave 1-2 branches of leaves on the stem. Make sure none of the leaves are too low on the stem or it will interfere with the "handle" of your bouquet. Be sure to choose leaves that are hydrated and feel firm.     Spray roses consist of 3-5 smaller blossoms on each stem, and have a more casual feel then your normal florists' roses. They are readily available at markets and florists all year.     Gather a few stems in one hand at a 45 degree angle. Each time you add a stem, turn your bouquet. Don't be afraid to place some blossoms higher than others. This gives your bouquet depth and interest.     Be sure to add leaves in as you go. These frame the blossoms and give the bouquet a natural feel. Tie with twine, cover in florist tape (to protect the ribbon) and tie up with a ribbon.     By deconstructing the spray roses, you can create a bouquet that looks very natural. Your guests will never guess that your flowers came from the local grocery!     The total cost of this bouquet: $12 + ribbon!     Enjoy your beautiful, garden bouquet!
    12
  • Photo By Chelsea Fuss

    This centerpiece is stunning - mainly because of the vibrant blooms!      Materials: 10 red, white and pink anemones  5 mini daffodils 8 orange, red, and white ranunculus (better if blown open) Ranunculus greens and buds English daisies in pink and white (cut from 2 plants) Modern vase Rocks Chicken wire or a flower frog Clippers

    Directions:

    First, fill the vase with rocks half way up the vase. Fill with water. Start filling the vase with stems. The rocks will keep the flowers in place and help you create the shape of your flower arrangement.     Try to create an "s" shape with greens and lighter flowers cascading to the right and diagonally across at the bottom of the vase.     Place larger blossoms at the bottom of the arrangement and lighter smaller buds and greens towards the top.     We added a table number made from a simple number sticker purchased at a grocery/drygoods store...     ... and a painted horse for some humor!     Tip: To make this arrangement more budget friendly, substitute more greens for flowers. The recipe is made of spring flowers. For a summer or fall version substitute with: dahlias (the single petaled varieties would work great), iceland poppies, garden roses, peonies, california poppies, daisies, roses.   Photo By Chelsea Fuss
    6
  • Photos By Chelsea Fuss

      Materials: Four bunches of daffodils: use different colors and flowers that are at different stages. The paperwhite daffodil, "Grand Soleil d'Or" has small petals and gives the bouquet the wild feel. String Scissors and/or clippers Suslin or cotton     Directions: 1. Remove the leaves from the daffodils and separate the flowers and leaves into piles.     2. Grab a few stems of flowers and hold in your left hand if you are right-handed and right hand if you are left-handed.     3. Alternate, adding flowers and leaves. Each time you add another bunch, turn the bouquet.   4. Once you like how it looks, trim the stems and tie the bouquet together with a string.     5. Cut into a piece of cotton muslin just an inch and then tear a 1" x 12" long piece.   6. Tie the bouquet together with the cotton.     Tip: Daffodils don't like to have their stems cut a lot and will exude a sticky substance. Try to just cut them once and keep them in a cold, dark place until ready for use.     Photos By Chelsea Fuss
    3
  • Project and Photos By: Victoria Hudgins

    The latte bowl is having a wonderful design moment this year. Coming out at every store in the most beautiful hues, textures and styles. Grab a stack of coordinating bowls and bunches of your favorite flowers to finish off reception tables with a beautiful touch.     Using latte bowls as centerpieces gives a gorgeous presentation to flowers, allows you to use fewer stems (which saves money!) and they are low enough to allow guests to see each other and chat across the table.    1. Collect anywhere from 1-3 bowls per table in coordinating colors and designs. Place a small floral ball in water to soak for hours before putting the centerpieces together. You will need to make these on the day of your event, so enlist the help of a good friend to do the final put together and placement.     2. Carefully poke 3-4 stems of your favorite fully-blooming flowers into the balls.     3. Mist to keep florals alert just before table placement.       Project and Photos By: Victoria Hudgins
    8
  • Project and Photos By: Chelsea Fuss

    Instead of corsages, consider giving the mothers of the wedding party small bouquets to carry. No need to worry about pinning on finicky corsages, let them carry these sweet bouquets instead.     You will need: Around 10 stems of flowers including 3 large open blossoms, 1 stem of greenery, 1 stem of filler, and a mix of budded and open flowers in different shapes and sizes. Pictured: 2 parrott tulips, 2 stems of ranunculus, 2 stems of mimosa, 3 stems muscari, 1 stem hyacinth.   Other flowers that work well: roses, lisianthus, astiilbe, queen anne's lace, lily of the valley, and herbs.   Finally, you'll need string, scissors, clippers, ribbon and a vase to hold bouquets.     Directions: 1. Strip most of the leaves off the flowers and cut the stems around 6 inches short.     2. Hold a few of the flowers in one hand and add flowers and greenery with the other hand, until the bouquet looks about right.     3. Tie with a string.     4. Trim the stems about 4 inches long.     5. Tie with a ribbon.      6. Keep in vase with a label until the event or photos begin!   Tip: When arranging the flowers, remember you can balance out one large flower with 3 smaller flowers. Another idea is to keep the larger, open flowers towards the bottom and the lighter flowers and buds towards the top of the bouquet.     The mothers in your wedding party will love carrying these sweet nosegays and can enjoy them for about a week after the wedding!        Aren't they stunning?     Project and Photos By: Chelsea Fuss  
    3
  • Project and Photos By: Brittni Mehlhoff 

    These floral minis are a sweet and unique way to incorporate fresh flowers into your reception décor.

    They're fairly easy to make and can double as favors. Imagine how pretty they'd be situated on top of each place setting!

    Supplies:

    Scissors Floral foam  Small vessel or decorative bowl One large bowl filled with water Hydrangeas and other fresh flowers with small to medium size blooms

    Step One: Cut down a piece of floral foam to fit snug inside the vessel or small, decorative bowl.     Step Two: Once the foam has been cut to size, drop it into a large bowl of water and let it sink to the bottom. After letting it soak for about a minute, place it back into the small vessel, and begin cutting down your fresh flowers. Each stem should be cut at a sharp angle to ensure it can pierce through the foam.     Step Three: Starting in the center and working your way out, begin adding short stems of hydrangea clusters to the arrangement.     Step Four: Once the entire bowl is filled, add additional flowers and fillers. Depending on where they are placed, some stems will need to be slightly longer than others. Add finishing touches with your favorite blooms and fill areas that look sparse.     Styling Tip: When the seasons change, so does floral availability. Just remember, hydrangeas are a key factor for keeping this project simple. The stems are nice and hearty and hold the surrounding florals in place.     These miniature arrangements can also be displayed on a place card table with paper flag table numbers or dispersed with small votive candles along the center of a long banquet table.    

     

    13
  • Photos By: Chelsea Fuss

    We love this refreshing take on the potted plant! Take a 4” blooming plant and wrap it in newspaper and twine for an earthy but unique wedding favor or centerpiece. Here’s the how-to!

    You'll need: 

    4” seasonal blooming plants. 1/4 of a page of newspaper for each plant. We used the French newspaper, Le Monde Diplomatique for it’s heavy, shiny quality (and the romantic wording!) but you could use any newspaper that has significance (in date or language) to you as a couple. Scissors. Waxed twine.     Directions: Cut a 1/4 of newspaper page for each plant.     Take the center ends and turn them up towards the plant and flat against the pot. Wrap the sides over and fold. Tie with waxed twine.     The pots can be set out as favors or they can double as centerpieces by being displayed down the center of a family style table.     How sweet is this place card?     Use the blooms as a guide for your color scheme by displaying them on pretty matching fabric or with coordinating napkins.     We used violas, but other options include daffodils or hyacinth for spring, miniature marigold or daisies for summer, chrysanthemums or pansies for fall, tulip or paperwhites for winter.     Tip: Make sure the bottoms of the plants are dry or the newspaper will get wet. You can also include a small piece of cellophane under the pot or line the newspaper so that you can water the plants.     Your guests will love this bright, seasonal decoration and they’ll be happy to take them off your hands at the end of the evening.    

     

    2
  • Photos By: Mary Swenson

    Wrist corsages are a pretty and very budget-friendly alternative to bouquets for your bridal party, and are easy to make yourself in just a few steps! 

    Start by selecting ribbon for your corsages. The color, width, and fabric possibilities for ribbon are absolutely endless, but be sure to choose one that's at least an inch wide to carry the weight of flowers. We chose inch and a half satin ribbon for our project.     Cut each ribbon to a length long enough to fit around a wrist, with a few inches extra to trail down after the bow is tied. Then, cut a small hole in the middle of the ribbon and cut the ends at an angle for a finished look.     Choose a few simple flowers in complimentary colors that work well together in a small bunch. Three blooms tend to work best for a wrist corsage; or, go with a single large bloom for a simple and modern look.     Cut the flowers close the the base, and take a piece floral wire and bend it into a hairpin shape. You will need one piece of wire in this shape for each flower in your corsage.     Stick the wire into the center of each flower and push it through the flower, so that each wire comes out on either side of the stem.     If you're using multiple flowers for your corsage, form them into a small bouquet and twist the wires together. Starting at the underside of the flower, wrap the wires together with floral tape. If you're using a single bloom, simply wrap the wire on that bloom with floral tape.

    Stick your flowers through the hole in your ribbon.

    Use fabric glue to glue the tape-covered wire stems to the underside of the fabric and allow to dry completely.     The lovely finished product -- a beautiful, wearable alternative to a bouquet, at a fraction of the cost!  

     

    4
  • Project and Photos By: Chelsea Fuss

    It's your wedding day, so carry the bouquet you love. This recipe is for a pretty, fragrant garden rose bouquet, that you can make yourself! We've shared some insiders florists's tips to help you along the way. The total cost was around $50!     Flower Recipe: 6 garden roses (ask your florist for David Austin or old garden roses and they can help you) 1 bunch of spray roses 2 stems of rice flower 1 stem of fern clippers scissors twill ribbon twine   Step One: Start by trimming up all of the flowers. Remove most of the leaves and extra branches from the stems. Remember, you can save these and make small flower girl bouquets from them like florists do. Save any stems that are more than 2 inches to do so.     Step Two: De-thorn your roses by taking a towel and running it down the stem of the roses with a little bit of strength. This is a florist's trick!     Step Three: Cut all of the stems at an angle and let them soak in lukewarm water. If you have any roses that are closed, you can put them in a warm place so that they open up, but do keep them away from direct sunlight. Garden roses open up fairly quickly so you'll actually want them just open midway when you start to arrange the bouquet. Once you start working with them, the roses will continue opening because they'll be warm from your hands.     Step Four: Start with a few of the larger garden roses, grouped loosely together. Hold the bouquet in the same hand while making it and add flowers in with your other hand. Turn the bouquet each time you add flowers.     Step Five: Next, add spray roses to fill in between the garden roses. Be sure to keep the garden roses mostly grouped together, eventually you'll fill the other side with spray roses, rice flower and fern.     Step Six: Add in the rice flower between the clusters of spray roses.     Step Seven: Add the fern to that same side of the bouquet to balance the large garden roses.     Step Eight: Secure the bouquet with twine, trim the stems, and cover the twine with twill ribbon.     Store the bouquet in water, in a cool place until ready for use.    
    9
  • Project and Photos By: Chelsea Fuss

    For the bride who loves the seaside, tradition, and classic, clean lines, this might be just the right bouquet! It's easy to make and costs around $45. Another great thing about this recipe is that the flowers are available year round!     Supplies: flower clippers twine scissors ribbon bucket with water vase full-length mirror   Flower Recipe: 5 open white roses (make sure they aren't all the way open because they will open quickly once the bouquet is made). 8 white hydrangeas     Step One: Remove the leaves from the roses and the lower leaves from the hydrangeas. Keep the leaves at the top of the hydrangea stems as they will help frame the bouquet.     Step Two: Gather three hydrangeas in one hand (tip: in the left hand if you are right-handed or vice versa).     Step Three: Add a group of roses, each stem at varying heights. Fill in the holes with hydrangeas.     Step Four: Hold the bouquet in front of you and look in a full-length mirror to make sure that the shape is how you like it. Make any adjustments and tie with twine.     Step Five: Clip the stems short.     Keep in a vase in a fridge (away from fruit and food) and add the ribbon a few hours before your ceremony!  
    7

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