SHOW FILTERS
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Flowers Wedding Ideas

  • Project and Photos By: Chelsea Fuss

    For the bride who loves the seaside, tradition, and classic, clean lines, this might be just the right bouquet! It's easy to make and costs around $45. Another great thing about this recipe is that the flowers are available year round!     Supplies: flower clippers twine scissors ribbon bucket with water vase full-length mirror   Flower Recipe: 5 open white roses (make sure they aren't all the way open because they will open quickly once the bouquet is made). 8 white hydrangeas     Step One: Remove the leaves from the roses and the lower leaves from the hydrangeas. Keep the leaves at the top of the hydrangea stems as they will help frame the bouquet.     Step Two: Gather three hydrangeas in one hand (tip: in the left hand if you are right-handed or vice versa).     Step Three: Add a group of roses, each stem at varying heights. Fill in the holes with hydrangeas.     Step Four: Hold the bouquet in front of you and look in a full-length mirror to make sure that the shape is how you like it. Make any adjustments and tie with twine.     Step Five: Clip the stems short.     Keep in a vase in a fridge (away from fruit and food) and add the ribbon a few hours before your ceremony!  
    6
  • Project and Photos by Brittni Mehlhoff   Save money on wedding flowers by making the groom and groomsmen boutonnieres on your own. Using a combination of flowers from the grocery store and a few silk leaves, you can create these festive fall boutonnieres for about $3 a piece.      Aside from being inexpensive, they're very easy to make. It's a great activity to get bridesmaids involved in too, so you don't have to worry about a thing.   Supplies: Spray roses in fall colors (orange, mustard, or burgundy) Silk fall leaves Orange wax flowers String or twine Scissors

    How-To:

    1. Start by cutting the bottom of the silk leaf away to create a smaller leaf with with a longer stem.

      2. Then cut a small sprig from a larger wax flower branch and remove any flowers that are at the bottom of the stem.     3. Add the wax flower on top of the silk leaf, allowing the tip of the wax flower to rest just above the height of the silk leaf. Pinch with your fingertips just below the base of the leaf and wax flower bunch to hold everything in place while arranging.     4. Next add your spray roses at varying heights, allowing the wax flowers to peek through above the rose blooms.     5. Using a piece of string or twine about 8 inches long to make wrapping and tying easier, wrap the string around all the stems tightly three or four times. Then tie a double knot in the back before cutting off the excess string.     6. Now cut the end of all the stems to the same length about 1/2 - 1 inch below the wrapped string.       7. Add a small amount of water (less than an inch) to short glasses to keep boutonnieres fresh for up to 24 hours until the big day. Attach bout to lapel with a straight pin before the ceremony.

    8
  • By: Victoria Hudgins 

    These trendy, crafted flowers will look amazing in bouquets or décor!     I was inspired by a pre-made version and quickly realized how easy the flowers are to whip up! Consider making a bouquet for everyone in your wedding party or a few dozen to construct a ceremony backdrop.   Materials: Extra long crepe paper in the colors of your choice Floral wire Scissors Green floral tape     Step One: Working horizontally, begin by folding your crepe paper in a small accordion fold. Use your finger to gently roll over the top 1/4 inch of the paper giving it a pretty curled edge.     Step Two: Place a floral wire half way up the paper at one end and begin rolling the paper up TIGHTLY. To get the exaggerated effect, focus on tightly gathering the bottom 1/4" of the paper, letting the top open wide. Tie off the flower at the base of the 'stem' with a simple thread and knot. It helps to have a second pair of hands for this part!         Step Three: Wrap the entire stem with green floral tape.         {Photos by Victoria Hudgins}
    11
  • Photo By Chelsea Fuss

    Using five varieties of Lilac and a a few stems of springtime Spirea, we created a gathered, musky bouquet that any bride would be happy to sink her nose in for a day. The textured, romantic style is perfect for a modern, traditional or country wedding.             You will need: 30 stems of lilac.  We used: Korean Lilac (tiny flowers), "Beauty of Moscow (light pink), "Mount Baker" (white), Common Purple Lilac and Wedgewood Blue. 15 stems of spirea string flower clippers ribbon or cloth tape   Directions: 1. Condition flowers overnight. Cut the stems and cut a slit upwards in each stem to allow it to drink water. Sit them in lukewarm water in a cool place away from drafts, heat, and fruit and food.   2. Strip most of the leaves off the lilacs. Usually the stems are long so trim them to around 12" each. Make sure there is one stem per large blossom. If there are two stems, trim one off.     3. Make piles of each type and color.   4. Gather 1- 2 stems in your one hand. Add stems at a 45 degree angle. Turn the bouquet to the right each time you add stems.     The stems should spiral. For the most part, larger, heavier blooms should sit at the bottom of the bouquet and lighter buds and blossoms should sit near the top.     5. Secure with twine or string.     6. Add a ribbon. We used a patterned cloth tape (usually sold for bookbinding) and simply wrapped it on top of the string. If you use a ribbon, secure with a pin.     Tips for working with lilacs: Always give them a clean cut when you bring them home. Cut at an angle, and then cut upwards into the stem, once. Use lukewarm water, lilacs don't like to be shocked by really cold or hot water.  If some blooms start to wilt, recut the stems. Keep away from fruit, food, direct sunlight, and drafts. Plan to buy a bit more than you need, a few stems in the bunch will always wilt.   Don't be afraid to work with lilac, if you remember these simple tips, it's easy!   Photo By Chelsea Fuss
    9
  • By: Chelsea Fuss

    This bouquet is so simple and effortless. Pair it with a lace dress or a simple sheath. The burlap adds a rustic touch that keeps it from being too sweet. The best part? This bouquet only costs around $15!     Materials: 10 double-petaled tulips 1-2 stems of "cheerful" narcissus Twine A piece of burlap A vase  Scissors   Directions:   1. Trim the very ends of the flowers.     2. Start with a few of the larger tulips at the bottom of the bouquet; add the smaller tulips towards the top.     3. Add the narcissus blossoms towards the bottom of the bouquet and off-center.     4. Wrap in twine, then wrap the burlap over that.       Your bouquet will be bright and fragrant.. enjoy the springtime blooms!   By: Chelsea Fuss
    9
  • Photo By Chelsea Fuss

    This centerpiece is stunning - mainly because of the vibrant blooms!      Materials: 10 red, white and pink anemones  5 mini daffodils 8 orange, red, and white ranunculus (better if blown open) Ranunculus greens and buds English daisies in pink and white (cut from 2 plants) Modern vase Rocks Chicken wire or a flower frog Clippers

    Directions:

    First, fill the vase with rocks half way up the vase. Fill with water. Start filling the vase with stems. The rocks will keep the flowers in place and help you create the shape of your flower arrangement.     Try to create an "s" shape with greens and lighter flowers cascading to the right and diagonally across at the bottom of the vase.     Place larger blossoms at the bottom of the arrangement and lighter smaller buds and greens towards the top.     We added a table number made from a simple number sticker purchased at a grocery/drygoods store...     ... and a painted horse for some humor!     Tip: To make this arrangement more budget friendly, substitute more greens for flowers. The recipe is made of spring flowers. For a summer or fall version substitute with: dahlias (the single petaled varieties would work great), iceland poppies, garden roses, peonies, california poppies, daisies, roses.   Photo By Chelsea Fuss
    5
  • Photos By Chelsea Fuss

      Materials: Four bunches of daffodils: use different colors and flowers that are at different stages. The paperwhite daffodil, "Grand Soleil d'Or" has small petals and gives the bouquet the wild feel. String Scissors and/or clippers Suslin or cotton     Directions: 1. Remove the leaves from the daffodils and separate the flowers and leaves into piles.     2. Grab a few stems of flowers and hold in your left hand if you are right-handed and right hand if you are left-handed.     3. Alternate, adding flowers and leaves. Each time you add another bunch, turn the bouquet.   4. Once you like how it looks, trim the stems and tie the bouquet together with a string.     5. Cut into a piece of cotton muslin just an inch and then tear a 1" x 12" long piece.   6. Tie the bouquet together with the cotton.     Tip: Daffodils don't like to have their stems cut a lot and will exude a sticky substance. Try to just cut them once and keep them in a cold, dark place until ready for use.     Photos By Chelsea Fuss
    3
  • Project and Photos By: Chelsea Fuss

    Instead of corsages, consider giving the mothers of the wedding party small bouquets to carry. No need to worry about pinning on finicky corsages, let them carry these sweet bouquets instead.     You will need: Around 10 stems of flowers including 3 large open blossoms, 1 stem of greenery, 1 stem of filler, and a mix of budded and open flowers in different shapes and sizes. Pictured: 2 parrott tulips, 2 stems of ranunculus, 2 stems of mimosa, 3 stems muscari, 1 stem hyacinth.   Other flowers that work well: roses, lisianthus, astiilbe, queen anne's lace, lily of the valley, and herbs.   Finally, you'll need string, scissors, clippers, ribbon and a vase to hold bouquets.     Directions: 1. Strip most of the leaves off the flowers and cut the stems around 6 inches short.     2. Hold a few of the flowers in one hand and add flowers and greenery with the other hand, until the bouquet looks about right.     3. Tie with a string.     4. Trim the stems about 4 inches long.     5. Tie with a ribbon.      6. Keep in vase with a label until the event or photos begin!   Tip: When arranging the flowers, remember you can balance out one large flower with 3 smaller flowers. Another idea is to keep the larger, open flowers towards the bottom and the lighter flowers and buds towards the top of the bouquet.     The mothers in your wedding party will love carrying these sweet nosegays and can enjoy them for about a week after the wedding!        Aren't they stunning?     Project and Photos By: Chelsea Fuss  
    1
  • Photos By: Olivia Kanaley

    For this project you will need fabric - we used chiffon and tulle. Yardage needed will vary based on the number and size of flowers, as well as the fabric thickness. You'll also need a piece of paper, a pen, scissors, pins, needle and thread, glass seed beads, and a plain hair clip or comb.

      To make a stencil first free hand a rose petal shape and cut out. Then retrace it five times on a larger sheet of paper to create a full flower shape. This will help you get an even pattern. Cut out pattern.     Take some fabric and fold it into a square a little larger than your flower pattern. Pin the pattern to fabric and carefully cut out. Repeat this process until you have enough layers to make a full flower - the number of layers will vary depending on the weight of your fabrics and the size of your flower. The example shown here uses 26 layers.     Stack flower cut outs, alternating fabric types and staggering petals. Use a needle and thread to secure them together at the center.     Pinch together the center of the flower (from the bottom) and secure with stitches to create volume and give the flower and authentic shape.     If desired you can sew decorative beads in the inside center of the flower.     Finally, sew the flower to a hair clip or comb.     You can also create a tie-on corsage or sash, by sewing one or more flowers to a length of silk ribbon.

     

    24
  • Project and Photos By: Brittni Mehlhoff 

    These floral minis are a sweet and unique way to incorporate fresh flowers into your reception décor.

    They're fairly easy to make and can double as favors. Imagine how pretty they'd be situated on top of each place setting!

    Supplies:

    Scissors Floral foam  Small vessel or decorative bowl One large bowl filled with water Hydrangeas and other fresh flowers with small to medium size blooms

    Step One: Cut down a piece of floral foam to fit snug inside the vessel or small, decorative bowl.     Step Two: Once the foam has been cut to size, drop it into a large bowl of water and let it sink to the bottom. After letting it soak for about a minute, place it back into the small vessel, and begin cutting down your fresh flowers. Each stem should be cut at a sharp angle to ensure it can pierce through the foam.     Step Three: Starting in the center and working your way out, begin adding short stems of hydrangea clusters to the arrangement.     Step Four: Once the entire bowl is filled, add additional flowers and fillers. Depending on where they are placed, some stems will need to be slightly longer than others. Add finishing touches with your favorite blooms and fill areas that look sparse.     Styling Tip: When the seasons change, so does floral availability. Just remember, hydrangeas are a key factor for keeping this project simple. The stems are nice and hearty and hold the surrounding florals in place.     These miniature arrangements can also be displayed on a place card table with paper flag table numbers or dispersed with small votive candles along the center of a long banquet table.    

     

    13
  • Project and Photos By: Chelsea Fuss

    For the bride who loves the seaside, tradition, and classic, clean lines, this might be just the right bouquet! It's easy to make and costs around $45. Another great thing about this recipe is that the flowers are available year round!     Supplies: flower clippers twine scissors ribbon bucket with water vase full-length mirror   Flower Recipe: 5 open white roses (make sure they aren't all the way open because they will open quickly once the bouquet is made). 8 white hydrangeas     Step One: Remove the leaves from the roses and the lower leaves from the hydrangeas. Keep the leaves at the top of the hydrangea stems as they will help frame the bouquet.     Step Two: Gather three hydrangeas in one hand (tip: in the left hand if you are right-handed or vice versa).     Step Three: Add a group of roses, each stem at varying heights. Fill in the holes with hydrangeas.     Step Four: Hold the bouquet in front of you and look in a full-length mirror to make sure that the shape is how you like it. Make any adjustments and tie with twine.     Step Five: Clip the stems short.     Keep in a vase in a fridge (away from fruit and food) and add the ribbon a few hours before your ceremony!  
    6
  • Project and Photos by Brittni Mehlhoff   Save money on wedding flowers by making the groom and groomsmen boutonnieres on your own. Using a combination of flowers from the grocery store and a few silk leaves, you can create these festive fall boutonnieres for about $3 a piece.      Aside from being inexpensive, they're very easy to make. It's a great activity to get bridesmaids involved in too, so you don't have to worry about a thing.   Supplies: Spray roses in fall colors (orange, mustard, or burgundy) Silk fall leaves Orange wax flowers String or twine Scissors

    How-To:

    1. Start by cutting the bottom of the silk leaf away to create a smaller leaf with with a longer stem.

      2. Then cut a small sprig from a larger wax flower branch and remove any flowers that are at the bottom of the stem.     3. Add the wax flower on top of the silk leaf, allowing the tip of the wax flower to rest just above the height of the silk leaf. Pinch with your fingertips just below the base of the leaf and wax flower bunch to hold everything in place while arranging.     4. Next add your spray roses at varying heights, allowing the wax flowers to peek through above the rose blooms.     5. Using a piece of string or twine about 8 inches long to make wrapping and tying easier, wrap the string around all the stems tightly three or four times. Then tie a double knot in the back before cutting off the excess string.     6. Now cut the end of all the stems to the same length about 1/2 - 1 inch below the wrapped string.       7. Add a small amount of water (less than an inch) to short glasses to keep boutonnieres fresh for up to 24 hours until the big day. Attach bout to lapel with a straight pin before the ceremony.

    8
  • By: Victoria Hudgins 

    These trendy, crafted flowers will look amazing in bouquets or décor!     I was inspired by a pre-made version and quickly realized how easy the flowers are to whip up! Consider making a bouquet for everyone in your wedding party or a few dozen to construct a ceremony backdrop.   Materials: Extra long crepe paper in the colors of your choice Floral wire Scissors Green floral tape     Step One: Working horizontally, begin by folding your crepe paper in a small accordion fold. Use your finger to gently roll over the top 1/4 inch of the paper giving it a pretty curled edge.     Step Two: Place a floral wire half way up the paper at one end and begin rolling the paper up TIGHTLY. To get the exaggerated effect, focus on tightly gathering the bottom 1/4" of the paper, letting the top open wide. Tie off the flower at the base of the 'stem' with a simple thread and knot. It helps to have a second pair of hands for this part!         Step Three: Wrap the entire stem with green floral tape.         {Photos by Victoria Hudgins}
    11
  • Photo By Chelsea Fuss

    Using five varieties of Lilac and a a few stems of springtime Spirea, we created a gathered, musky bouquet that any bride would be happy to sink her nose in for a day. The textured, romantic style is perfect for a modern, traditional or country wedding.             You will need: 30 stems of lilac.  We used: Korean Lilac (tiny flowers), "Beauty of Moscow (light pink), "Mount Baker" (white), Common Purple Lilac and Wedgewood Blue. 15 stems of spirea string flower clippers ribbon or cloth tape   Directions: 1. Condition flowers overnight. Cut the stems and cut a slit upwards in each stem to allow it to drink water. Sit them in lukewarm water in a cool place away from drafts, heat, and fruit and food.   2. Strip most of the leaves off the lilacs. Usually the stems are long so trim them to around 12" each. Make sure there is one stem per large blossom. If there are two stems, trim one off.     3. Make piles of each type and color.   4. Gather 1- 2 stems in your one hand. Add stems at a 45 degree angle. Turn the bouquet to the right each time you add stems.     The stems should spiral. For the most part, larger, heavier blooms should sit at the bottom of the bouquet and lighter buds and blossoms should sit near the top.     5. Secure with twine or string.     6. Add a ribbon. We used a patterned cloth tape (usually sold for bookbinding) and simply wrapped it on top of the string. If you use a ribbon, secure with a pin.     Tips for working with lilacs: Always give them a clean cut when you bring them home. Cut at an angle, and then cut upwards into the stem, once. Use lukewarm water, lilacs don't like to be shocked by really cold or hot water.  If some blooms start to wilt, recut the stems. Keep away from fruit, food, direct sunlight, and drafts. Plan to buy a bit more than you need, a few stems in the bunch will always wilt.   Don't be afraid to work with lilac, if you remember these simple tips, it's easy!   Photo By Chelsea Fuss
    9
  • By: Chelsea Fuss

    This bouquet is so simple and effortless. Pair it with a lace dress or a simple sheath. The burlap adds a rustic touch that keeps it from being too sweet. The best part? This bouquet only costs around $15!     Materials: 10 double-petaled tulips 1-2 stems of "cheerful" narcissus Twine A piece of burlap A vase  Scissors   Directions:   1. Trim the very ends of the flowers.     2. Start with a few of the larger tulips at the bottom of the bouquet; add the smaller tulips towards the top.     3. Add the narcissus blossoms towards the bottom of the bouquet and off-center.     4. Wrap in twine, then wrap the burlap over that.       Your bouquet will be bright and fragrant.. enjoy the springtime blooms!   By: Chelsea Fuss
    9
  • Photo By Chelsea Fuss

    This centerpiece is stunning - mainly because of the vibrant blooms!      Materials: 10 red, white and pink anemones  5 mini daffodils 8 orange, red, and white ranunculus (better if blown open) Ranunculus greens and buds English daisies in pink and white (cut from 2 plants) Modern vase Rocks Chicken wire or a flower frog Clippers

    Directions:

    First, fill the vase with rocks half way up the vase. Fill with water. Start filling the vase with stems. The rocks will keep the flowers in place and help you create the shape of your flower arrangement.     Try to create an "s" shape with greens and lighter flowers cascading to the right and diagonally across at the bottom of the vase.     Place larger blossoms at the bottom of the arrangement and lighter smaller buds and greens towards the top.     We added a table number made from a simple number sticker purchased at a grocery/drygoods store...     ... and a painted horse for some humor!     Tip: To make this arrangement more budget friendly, substitute more greens for flowers. The recipe is made of spring flowers. For a summer or fall version substitute with: dahlias (the single petaled varieties would work great), iceland poppies, garden roses, peonies, california poppies, daisies, roses.   Photo By Chelsea Fuss
    5
  • Photos By Chelsea Fuss

      Materials: Four bunches of daffodils: use different colors and flowers that are at different stages. The paperwhite daffodil, "Grand Soleil d'Or" has small petals and gives the bouquet the wild feel. String Scissors and/or clippers Suslin or cotton     Directions: 1. Remove the leaves from the daffodils and separate the flowers and leaves into piles.     2. Grab a few stems of flowers and hold in your left hand if you are right-handed and right hand if you are left-handed.     3. Alternate, adding flowers and leaves. Each time you add another bunch, turn the bouquet.   4. Once you like how it looks, trim the stems and tie the bouquet together with a string.     5. Cut into a piece of cotton muslin just an inch and then tear a 1" x 12" long piece.   6. Tie the bouquet together with the cotton.     Tip: Daffodils don't like to have their stems cut a lot and will exude a sticky substance. Try to just cut them once and keep them in a cold, dark place until ready for use.     Photos By Chelsea Fuss
    3
  • Project and Photos By: Chelsea Fuss

    Instead of corsages, consider giving the mothers of the wedding party small bouquets to carry. No need to worry about pinning on finicky corsages, let them carry these sweet bouquets instead.     You will need: Around 10 stems of flowers including 3 large open blossoms, 1 stem of greenery, 1 stem of filler, and a mix of budded and open flowers in different shapes and sizes. Pictured: 2 parrott tulips, 2 stems of ranunculus, 2 stems of mimosa, 3 stems muscari, 1 stem hyacinth.   Other flowers that work well: roses, lisianthus, astiilbe, queen anne's lace, lily of the valley, and herbs.   Finally, you'll need string, scissors, clippers, ribbon and a vase to hold bouquets.     Directions: 1. Strip most of the leaves off the flowers and cut the stems around 6 inches short.     2. Hold a few of the flowers in one hand and add flowers and greenery with the other hand, until the bouquet looks about right.     3. Tie with a string.     4. Trim the stems about 4 inches long.     5. Tie with a ribbon.      6. Keep in vase with a label until the event or photos begin!   Tip: When arranging the flowers, remember you can balance out one large flower with 3 smaller flowers. Another idea is to keep the larger, open flowers towards the bottom and the lighter flowers and buds towards the top of the bouquet.     The mothers in your wedding party will love carrying these sweet nosegays and can enjoy them for about a week after the wedding!        Aren't they stunning?     Project and Photos By: Chelsea Fuss  
    1
  • Photos By: Olivia Kanaley

    For this project you will need fabric - we used chiffon and tulle. Yardage needed will vary based on the number and size of flowers, as well as the fabric thickness. You'll also need a piece of paper, a pen, scissors, pins, needle and thread, glass seed beads, and a plain hair clip or comb.

      To make a stencil first free hand a rose petal shape and cut out. Then retrace it five times on a larger sheet of paper to create a full flower shape. This will help you get an even pattern. Cut out pattern.     Take some fabric and fold it into a square a little larger than your flower pattern. Pin the pattern to fabric and carefully cut out. Repeat this process until you have enough layers to make a full flower - the number of layers will vary depending on the weight of your fabrics and the size of your flower. The example shown here uses 26 layers.     Stack flower cut outs, alternating fabric types and staggering petals. Use a needle and thread to secure them together at the center.     Pinch together the center of the flower (from the bottom) and secure with stitches to create volume and give the flower and authentic shape.     If desired you can sew decorative beads in the inside center of the flower.     Finally, sew the flower to a hair clip or comb.     You can also create a tie-on corsage or sash, by sewing one or more flowers to a length of silk ribbon.

     

    24
  • Project and Photos By: Brittni Mehlhoff 

    These floral minis are a sweet and unique way to incorporate fresh flowers into your reception décor.

    They're fairly easy to make and can double as favors. Imagine how pretty they'd be situated on top of each place setting!

    Supplies:

    Scissors Floral foam  Small vessel or decorative bowl One large bowl filled with water Hydrangeas and other fresh flowers with small to medium size blooms

    Step One: Cut down a piece of floral foam to fit snug inside the vessel or small, decorative bowl.     Step Two: Once the foam has been cut to size, drop it into a large bowl of water and let it sink to the bottom. After letting it soak for about a minute, place it back into the small vessel, and begin cutting down your fresh flowers. Each stem should be cut at a sharp angle to ensure it can pierce through the foam.     Step Three: Starting in the center and working your way out, begin adding short stems of hydrangea clusters to the arrangement.     Step Four: Once the entire bowl is filled, add additional flowers and fillers. Depending on where they are placed, some stems will need to be slightly longer than others. Add finishing touches with your favorite blooms and fill areas that look sparse.     Styling Tip: When the seasons change, so does floral availability. Just remember, hydrangeas are a key factor for keeping this project simple. The stems are nice and hearty and hold the surrounding florals in place.     These miniature arrangements can also be displayed on a place card table with paper flag table numbers or dispersed with small votive candles along the center of a long banquet table.    

     

    13

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