SHOW FILTERS
66

Flowers Wedding Ideas

  • Photos By: Chelsea Fuss

    We love this refreshing take on the potted plant! Take a 4” blooming plant and wrap it in newspaper and twine for an earthy but unique wedding favor or centerpiece. Here’s the how-to!

    You'll need: 

    4” seasonal blooming plants. 1/4 of a page of newspaper for each plant. We used the French newspaper, Le Monde Diplomatique for it’s heavy, shiny quality (and the romantic wording!) but you could use any newspaper that has significance (in date or language) to you as a couple. Scissors. Waxed twine.     Directions: Cut a 1/4 of newspaper page for each plant.     Take the center ends and turn them up towards the plant and flat against the pot. Wrap the sides over and fold. Tie with waxed twine.     The pots can be set out as favors or they can double as centerpieces by being displayed down the center of a family style table.     How sweet is this place card?     Use the blooms as a guide for your color scheme by displaying them on pretty matching fabric or with coordinating napkins.     We used violas, but other options include daffodils or hyacinth for spring, miniature marigold or daisies for summer, chrysanthemums or pansies for fall, tulip or paperwhites for winter.     Tip: Make sure the bottoms of the plants are dry or the newspaper will get wet. You can also include a small piece of cellophane under the pot or line the newspaper so that you can water the plants.     Your guests will love this bright, seasonal decoration and they’ll be happy to take them off your hands at the end of the evening.    

     

    2
  • Photos By: Mary Swenson

    Wrist corsages are a pretty and very budget-friendly alternative to bouquets for your bridal party, and are easy to make yourself in just a few steps! 

    Start by selecting ribbon for your corsages. The color, width, and fabric possibilities for ribbon are absolutely endless, but be sure to choose one that's at least an inch wide to carry the weight of flowers. We chose inch and a half satin ribbon for our project.     Cut each ribbon to a length long enough to fit around a wrist, with a few inches extra to trail down after the bow is tied. Then, cut a small hole in the middle of the ribbon and cut the ends at an angle for a finished look.     Choose a few simple flowers in complimentary colors that work well together in a small bunch. Three blooms tend to work best for a wrist corsage; or, go with a single large bloom for a simple and modern look.     Cut the flowers close the the base, and take a piece floral wire and bend it into a hairpin shape. You will need one piece of wire in this shape for each flower in your corsage.     Stick the wire into the center of each flower and push it through the flower, so that each wire comes out on either side of the stem.     If you're using multiple flowers for your corsage, form them into a small bouquet and twist the wires together. Starting at the underside of the flower, wrap the wires together with floral tape. If you're using a single bloom, simply wrap the wire on that bloom with floral tape.

    Stick your flowers through the hole in your ribbon.

    Use fabric glue to glue the tape-covered wire stems to the underside of the fabric and allow to dry completely.     The lovely finished product -- a beautiful, wearable alternative to a bouquet, at a fraction of the cost!  

     

    4
  • Project By: Urban Petals Floral Design

    Photos By: Chris Zarconi Photography     Runway Inspiration What better place to draw inspiration for your wedding- whether it be attire or décor, than from the runway? Inspired by this gorgeous Elie Saab gown, founder of Urban Petals Floral Design, Sarah von Pollaro, designed a sweet springtime centerpiece that you can make at home.      Image of Elie Saab dress from Style.com   Supplies & Materials: From the Flower Empowered Toolkit: Floral Clippers, Floral Tape, and Floral Wire    Other Supplies: White vase (approximately 6 inches tall and 6 inches wide), 2 stems H. hoetidus hellebore, 1 stem Manhatten euonumus, 5 stems aspidistra leaves, 3 stems Blondie waxflower, 7 stems Cream stock, 10 stems Skyline roses, 5 stems Cream lisianthus, 5 stems H. hybridus hellebore.   Step One: Make a Grid Fill vase with water and make a tape grid using floral tape.      Step Two: Prep Greenery Break down large stems of greens into small pieces with floral clippers.      Step Three: Apistrada Loops Bind the tip of the leaf to the stem with floral wire.      Step Four: Prep Waxflowers Break down large stems into small pieces with floral clippers.      Step Five: Prep Roses Prepare roses by removing leaves and hand opening petals.      Step Six: Add Greenery Add greenery and leaves to the vase.      Step Seven: Add Stock Add stock flowers to the vase.      Step Eight: Add Flowers Add waxflowers and roses to the vase.      Ta-da! You've got a runway-inspired, expertly styled DIY centerpiece.        About the Expert Sarah von Pollaro is the founder of Urban Petals Floral Design, which creates one of a kind floral designs for events, donates them to nonprofit organizations the following day and inspires people to enjoy arranging flowers. Sarah's designs have adorned the White House, the Kennedy Center, and the Macy's Flower Show.    She has taught thousands of people the basics of floral design in a fun and simple way and created Flower Empowered to provide inspiration, tools, tips, and tricks of the trade online. Sharing her passion for flowers and practical techniques, Sarah demystifies the world of floral design so that anyone on any budget can experience the joy of creating arrangements for their home, special occasions, and gifts.    Visit Sarah’s website, Flower Empowered, for tips, tricks, and techniques to help design your own wedding flowers as well as essential tools including the new Wedding Floral Design Toolkit.  
    2
  • The ultimate accessory for the bridal party!    Project By: Janie Medley Photos By: Marvelous Things Photography   The ultimate accessory for a bridal party, this pretty DIY only took 15 minutes to make!  You might want to take it beyond the wedding day, though, for date night or “just because.”     You Will Need: Peonies Ranunculus Jasmine Vine Scissors Headband Floral Adhesive     Step One: Glue the jasmine vine or whatever greenery you choose down the middle of the headband. For a whimsical look and feel, don’t glue the vines to the sides of the headband.     Step Two: Cut the stems off each of the flowers, so the flower head will lay flat.       Step Three: Glue them one by one onto the headband. You will need to hold the flower head in place for 10 seconds, after applying the glue.     You’re done! How cute is that?!     Make one for each member of your bridal party and complement them with this lush floral crown  
    1
  • Project By: Janie Medley Photos By: Marvelous Things Photography   The fun thing about this arrangement is that you don’t have to have floral design skills to make it work. This is one of the easiest DIYs ever.      Colorful Ranunculus One of my favorite things about ranunculus is that this gorgeous flower comes in so many beautiful colors. They are the perfect blooms to add a pop of big, vibrant color.      Materials 30 Ranunculus (from FiftyFlowers.com) 30 Assorted bud vases Finished or unfinished wood box display Scissors Water     Step One  Fill the vases with water and cut the stems to the desired height.  Pop one bloom (or a bloom and a bud) in each vase.       Step Two Line the vases up in rows in your wooden box.  Depending on the size of the container, you may need to add something in the bottom to give the vases added height. I used dry oasis, and the great thing about using the oasis is that it helps to keep the vases in place.      This arrangement would look stunning on the guest book table and could double as favors for your guests. For added personalization, tie a small name tag around the top of each vase with a special thank you for your guest.    
    2
  • Project and Photos By: Mary Swenson     Flowers can end up being a huge part of a wedding budget, but luckily there are easy ways to create beautiful arrangements on your own without a big expense. If you're thinking about tackling the flowers for your day yourself, we've come up with three types of arrangements that will make this an easy feat.     The simplest, can't-go-wrong type of arrangement is to fill your container with only one color of one type of flower. Flowers en masse - whether they be hydrangeas, roses, or tulips (like we show here) - are a sophisticated look that you just can't go wrong with. The best part? Not only is this strategy the easiest way to arrange flowers, but it also means that you can use inexpensive flowers and still have a stunning centerpiece.      With our tulips, we left most of the leaf on each stem, which helped this arrangement look lush and casual, and allowed us to buy fewer tulips to fill the container. For a more formal, modern look, you can strip all of the leaves off your flower's stem and bunch them together tightly.     Another simple arrangement is one that consists of different colors of one type of flower. The color variations will add visual interest to your table, but the use of only one type of flower still keeps the look cohesive and clean.     For our arrangement, we used dahilas in complimentary hues, and we spread the different colors out so that they were balanced among the arrangement.     The third option is to use different types of flowers in the same color to create an interesting yet put-together arrangement that will rival what any florist could do!     With this look, it's important to make sure most of the leaves are removed from the flower stems, and that the flowers are bunched together tightly. This will help your arrangement to look neat and professional. Also, make sure to spread out the different types of flowers throughout the arrangement - using floral foam inside your container will help  with this.     No matter what type of arrangement you go with, keeping it simple is the best way to go if you're thinking about doing the flowers for your event. They'll look beautiful!  
    2
  • Project and Photos By: Chelsea Fuss     During spring, summer, and fall, flower stalls at farmer's markets often sell seasonal stems already tightly bundled. Just add a ribbon and you've got a deceptively sophisticated bouquet for your big day.     We paid just $5 for each of these flower bundles (sweet pea, zinnia, and dahlia!).     Visit your local market prior to your wedding day to find out what's available in your area. Arrive at the market as soon as it opens to get a peek at the very best selection.     Keep your flowers away from heat, drafts and bright sun. Keep in water for as long as possible.     Chat with your local growers to find out what might be available on your wedding date.     Be open minded! Be spontaneous and choose your bridal bouquet from the freshest + most seasonal flowers instead of focusing on a certain flower or color.     Collect interesting ribbons with contrasting colors and fun patterns.     Voila - a pretty ribbon will make your bouquet unique and personal.     Common farmer's market flowers:   Spring:  Daffodils (early to mid spring) Tulips Lilac (late spring) Peony (late spring and early summer) Iris  Ranunculus   Summer: Peony ( early summer) Dahlia (mid to late summer) Zinnia (mid to late summer)   Fall: Dahlias Asters     Have fun with your flower arrangements!  
    2
  • Project and Photos By: Chelsea Fuss   This tulip bouquet is totally contemporary and beautifully chic.     Recipe: 5 dozen tulips. We used 2 shades of pink, white, and pink and green Parrott tulips. It's important to choose flowers in different stages of bloom.   1. Strip off leaves so the bottom 6 inches of the flowers' stems are bare. 2. Gather a few tulips at a time, holding in one hand. 3. Add about 3-5 tulips at a time, turning the bouquet each time you add them. 4. Keep an eye on the shape as you work. 5. Bind with floral tape (string will snap the stems). 6. Cover with ribbon.     Tulip Tips: The flowers will get limp the more they are worked- so handle with care! Tulips grow even after they are clipped. Keep it cool and refrigerated, away from drafts, food, and fruit. Make your bouquet a little tighter than you would like, since it will expand over night! It's best to buy tulips Jan-May and October-December. They are not in season in the summer and will wilt much faster.     Bridesmaid Bouquets: These garden-style bridesmaids bouquets are small, simple and sweet. Most of these flowers will be available January-May and October-December.     Recipe: 1 stem of cherry blossom 10 stems of ranunculus (some with buds and some in full bloom) 5 stems of sweet pea 3 stems of spirea 3 stems of open tulips     The How-To: Follow the same instructions as the tulip bouquet but add in taller stems, poking out above the rest. Add the sweet pea and cherry blossom last as it is quite delicate.     Tulip Boutonniere: 1.Cut the tulip so the stem is around 4-5 inches. 2. Take a leaf from a tulip and wrap it around the stem and blossom as shown in the photo. 3. Secure with floral tape. 4. Cover the tape by tying ribbon around it. 5. Don't forget the pins!     Tip: Again, keep refrigerated until use, away from drafts, food, and fruit. Food and fruit emit a gas that increases the speed of a flower's deterioration.     Orchid Wrist Corsage: Cymbidium orchids work best for this project and the result is a beautiful, effortless corsage. These corsages are great because you won't need to worry about putting pins into clothing. Cymbidiums are available almost all year long.     The How-To: 1. Cut the stem so it's about 5 inches long. 2. Cover the stem with floral tape. 3. Wrap ribbon around the stem and secure with a dot of glue (hot glue works best). 4. Take a long, wide ribbon and tie it in a double knot around the stem. 5. Tie the ribbon around the wrist, holding the flower flat against the top of the wrist.    
    1
  • Photos By: Mary Swenson     Simple, inexpensive clay pots can be turned into lovely little favors and centerpieces with just minimal effort and even less cash. Here's how!     To make the favors, we started with a small three-inch high pot. We cut the top off a plastic water bottle (make sure to keep the cap on), which fit perfectly inside as a liner for the pot.     Cut a piece of wet floral foam to fit inside the plastic liner.     Insert the liner and the foam into the pot, and fill the inside of the liner with water, so that the foam absorbs most of the water. The liner will ensure that the water stays away from the inside of the clay pot, preventing it from getting dark and wet (and, from leaking out of the hole that's in the bottom of most pots).     We purchased an inexpensive flower arrangement at a grocery store, cut out the flowers we wanted to use, and inserted the cut flowers into the foam. Since these favors will be going home with your guests, the foam will keep their arrangement intact during travel.     Our finished favor arrangement is sweet and simple!     Creating a matching centerpiece is even easier -- simply use a larger pot, and stick a cup of water inside the pot for your stems. We used the same flowers as we did for our favors, and added tulips for an extra touch.     The coordinating favors and centerpieces create a cohesive, beautiful look for your event!     To personalize your arrangements, print out guest names and table numbers on regular printer paper, cut into strips, and affix with double-sided tape or glue to the pots. So charming!  
    4
  • Photos By: Chelsea Fuss   Consider making the flower arrangements with friends and family a few days before the wedding. Have everyone bring flowers and herbs from their gardens and make an evening of it! This large wildflower arrangement will add the perfect charm to your food table and it's easy to make using just about any flowers from the garden.     You will need: A basket (we found this one for just $3.50 at Pier 1) Cellophane or plastic lining A water-tight container to fit inside the basket Floral tape Clippers     Directions: 1. Place the water-tight container inside the basket. Line with plastic if you are worried about it leaking.      2. Tape the floral tape across the bowl and secure tightly in a grid formation.     3. Start with the greens and the arching vines or twigs that will offer your arrangement shape. We started with greens and then the apple blossoms, using the curve of their stems to inspire the shape.     4. Make sure you are keeping the stems long enough so the flowers cover the rim of the basket.     5. Start filling in around the edges of the arrangement, these stems will provide support for the center flowers.     Larger blossoms look better at the base, with lighter, airy flowers placed toward the center and top of the arrangement.     Keep out of direct sunlight, away from drafts, and away from fruit until your big day.     Filler flowers are perfect for this arrangement. Here's a guide by season:   Spring: Apple blossom, forget-me-nots, candytuft, lilac, spirea, viburnum, jasmine, lily of the valley. Summer: Cosmos, nigella, queen anne's lace, herbs ,feverfew, butterfly bush, herbs and vegetable greens, fruit, berries. Fall: Dahlias, apple stems, herbs, crocosmia, pods and berries. Winter: Waxflower, ivy, salal, juniper, boxwood, bay.    
    4
  • Photos By: Chelsea Fuss

    We love this refreshing take on the potted plant! Take a 4” blooming plant and wrap it in newspaper and twine for an earthy but unique wedding favor or centerpiece. Here’s the how-to!

    You'll need: 

    4” seasonal blooming plants. 1/4 of a page of newspaper for each plant. We used the French newspaper, Le Monde Diplomatique for it’s heavy, shiny quality (and the romantic wording!) but you could use any newspaper that has significance (in date or language) to you as a couple. Scissors. Waxed twine.     Directions: Cut a 1/4 of newspaper page for each plant.     Take the center ends and turn them up towards the plant and flat against the pot. Wrap the sides over and fold. Tie with waxed twine.     The pots can be set out as favors or they can double as centerpieces by being displayed down the center of a family style table.     How sweet is this place card?     Use the blooms as a guide for your color scheme by displaying them on pretty matching fabric or with coordinating napkins.     We used violas, but other options include daffodils or hyacinth for spring, miniature marigold or daisies for summer, chrysanthemums or pansies for fall, tulip or paperwhites for winter.     Tip: Make sure the bottoms of the plants are dry or the newspaper will get wet. You can also include a small piece of cellophane under the pot or line the newspaper so that you can water the plants.     Your guests will love this bright, seasonal decoration and they’ll be happy to take them off your hands at the end of the evening.    

     

    2
  • Photos By: Mary Swenson

    Wrist corsages are a pretty and very budget-friendly alternative to bouquets for your bridal party, and are easy to make yourself in just a few steps! 

    Start by selecting ribbon for your corsages. The color, width, and fabric possibilities for ribbon are absolutely endless, but be sure to choose one that's at least an inch wide to carry the weight of flowers. We chose inch and a half satin ribbon for our project.     Cut each ribbon to a length long enough to fit around a wrist, with a few inches extra to trail down after the bow is tied. Then, cut a small hole in the middle of the ribbon and cut the ends at an angle for a finished look.     Choose a few simple flowers in complimentary colors that work well together in a small bunch. Three blooms tend to work best for a wrist corsage; or, go with a single large bloom for a simple and modern look.     Cut the flowers close the the base, and take a piece floral wire and bend it into a hairpin shape. You will need one piece of wire in this shape for each flower in your corsage.     Stick the wire into the center of each flower and push it through the flower, so that each wire comes out on either side of the stem.     If you're using multiple flowers for your corsage, form them into a small bouquet and twist the wires together. Starting at the underside of the flower, wrap the wires together with floral tape. If you're using a single bloom, simply wrap the wire on that bloom with floral tape.

    Stick your flowers through the hole in your ribbon.

    Use fabric glue to glue the tape-covered wire stems to the underside of the fabric and allow to dry completely.     The lovely finished product -- a beautiful, wearable alternative to a bouquet, at a fraction of the cost!  

     

    4
  • Project By: Urban Petals Floral Design

    Photos By: Chris Zarconi Photography     Runway Inspiration What better place to draw inspiration for your wedding- whether it be attire or décor, than from the runway? Inspired by this gorgeous Elie Saab gown, founder of Urban Petals Floral Design, Sarah von Pollaro, designed a sweet springtime centerpiece that you can make at home.      Image of Elie Saab dress from Style.com   Supplies & Materials: From the Flower Empowered Toolkit: Floral Clippers, Floral Tape, and Floral Wire    Other Supplies: White vase (approximately 6 inches tall and 6 inches wide), 2 stems H. hoetidus hellebore, 1 stem Manhatten euonumus, 5 stems aspidistra leaves, 3 stems Blondie waxflower, 7 stems Cream stock, 10 stems Skyline roses, 5 stems Cream lisianthus, 5 stems H. hybridus hellebore.   Step One: Make a Grid Fill vase with water and make a tape grid using floral tape.      Step Two: Prep Greenery Break down large stems of greens into small pieces with floral clippers.      Step Three: Apistrada Loops Bind the tip of the leaf to the stem with floral wire.      Step Four: Prep Waxflowers Break down large stems into small pieces with floral clippers.      Step Five: Prep Roses Prepare roses by removing leaves and hand opening petals.      Step Six: Add Greenery Add greenery and leaves to the vase.      Step Seven: Add Stock Add stock flowers to the vase.      Step Eight: Add Flowers Add waxflowers and roses to the vase.      Ta-da! You've got a runway-inspired, expertly styled DIY centerpiece.        About the Expert Sarah von Pollaro is the founder of Urban Petals Floral Design, which creates one of a kind floral designs for events, donates them to nonprofit organizations the following day and inspires people to enjoy arranging flowers. Sarah's designs have adorned the White House, the Kennedy Center, and the Macy's Flower Show.    She has taught thousands of people the basics of floral design in a fun and simple way and created Flower Empowered to provide inspiration, tools, tips, and tricks of the trade online. Sharing her passion for flowers and practical techniques, Sarah demystifies the world of floral design so that anyone on any budget can experience the joy of creating arrangements for their home, special occasions, and gifts.    Visit Sarah’s website, Flower Empowered, for tips, tricks, and techniques to help design your own wedding flowers as well as essential tools including the new Wedding Floral Design Toolkit.  
    2
  • The ultimate accessory for the bridal party!    Project By: Janie Medley Photos By: Marvelous Things Photography   The ultimate accessory for a bridal party, this pretty DIY only took 15 minutes to make!  You might want to take it beyond the wedding day, though, for date night or “just because.”     You Will Need: Peonies Ranunculus Jasmine Vine Scissors Headband Floral Adhesive     Step One: Glue the jasmine vine or whatever greenery you choose down the middle of the headband. For a whimsical look and feel, don’t glue the vines to the sides of the headband.     Step Two: Cut the stems off each of the flowers, so the flower head will lay flat.       Step Three: Glue them one by one onto the headband. You will need to hold the flower head in place for 10 seconds, after applying the glue.     You’re done! How cute is that?!     Make one for each member of your bridal party and complement them with this lush floral crown  
    1
  • Project By: Janie Medley Photos By: Marvelous Things Photography   The fun thing about this arrangement is that you don’t have to have floral design skills to make it work. This is one of the easiest DIYs ever.      Colorful Ranunculus One of my favorite things about ranunculus is that this gorgeous flower comes in so many beautiful colors. They are the perfect blooms to add a pop of big, vibrant color.      Materials 30 Ranunculus (from FiftyFlowers.com) 30 Assorted bud vases Finished or unfinished wood box display Scissors Water     Step One  Fill the vases with water and cut the stems to the desired height.  Pop one bloom (or a bloom and a bud) in each vase.       Step Two Line the vases up in rows in your wooden box.  Depending on the size of the container, you may need to add something in the bottom to give the vases added height. I used dry oasis, and the great thing about using the oasis is that it helps to keep the vases in place.      This arrangement would look stunning on the guest book table and could double as favors for your guests. For added personalization, tie a small name tag around the top of each vase with a special thank you for your guest.    
    2
  • Project and Photos By: Mary Swenson     Flowers can end up being a huge part of a wedding budget, but luckily there are easy ways to create beautiful arrangements on your own without a big expense. If you're thinking about tackling the flowers for your day yourself, we've come up with three types of arrangements that will make this an easy feat.     The simplest, can't-go-wrong type of arrangement is to fill your container with only one color of one type of flower. Flowers en masse - whether they be hydrangeas, roses, or tulips (like we show here) - are a sophisticated look that you just can't go wrong with. The best part? Not only is this strategy the easiest way to arrange flowers, but it also means that you can use inexpensive flowers and still have a stunning centerpiece.      With our tulips, we left most of the leaf on each stem, which helped this arrangement look lush and casual, and allowed us to buy fewer tulips to fill the container. For a more formal, modern look, you can strip all of the leaves off your flower's stem and bunch them together tightly.     Another simple arrangement is one that consists of different colors of one type of flower. The color variations will add visual interest to your table, but the use of only one type of flower still keeps the look cohesive and clean.     For our arrangement, we used dahilas in complimentary hues, and we spread the different colors out so that they were balanced among the arrangement.     The third option is to use different types of flowers in the same color to create an interesting yet put-together arrangement that will rival what any florist could do!     With this look, it's important to make sure most of the leaves are removed from the flower stems, and that the flowers are bunched together tightly. This will help your arrangement to look neat and professional. Also, make sure to spread out the different types of flowers throughout the arrangement - using floral foam inside your container will help  with this.     No matter what type of arrangement you go with, keeping it simple is the best way to go if you're thinking about doing the flowers for your event. They'll look beautiful!  
    2
  • Project and Photos By: Chelsea Fuss     During spring, summer, and fall, flower stalls at farmer's markets often sell seasonal stems already tightly bundled. Just add a ribbon and you've got a deceptively sophisticated bouquet for your big day.     We paid just $5 for each of these flower bundles (sweet pea, zinnia, and dahlia!).     Visit your local market prior to your wedding day to find out what's available in your area. Arrive at the market as soon as it opens to get a peek at the very best selection.     Keep your flowers away from heat, drafts and bright sun. Keep in water for as long as possible.     Chat with your local growers to find out what might be available on your wedding date.     Be open minded! Be spontaneous and choose your bridal bouquet from the freshest + most seasonal flowers instead of focusing on a certain flower or color.     Collect interesting ribbons with contrasting colors and fun patterns.     Voila - a pretty ribbon will make your bouquet unique and personal.     Common farmer's market flowers:   Spring:  Daffodils (early to mid spring) Tulips Lilac (late spring) Peony (late spring and early summer) Iris  Ranunculus   Summer: Peony ( early summer) Dahlia (mid to late summer) Zinnia (mid to late summer)   Fall: Dahlias Asters     Have fun with your flower arrangements!  
    2
  • Project and Photos By: Chelsea Fuss   This tulip bouquet is totally contemporary and beautifully chic.     Recipe: 5 dozen tulips. We used 2 shades of pink, white, and pink and green Parrott tulips. It's important to choose flowers in different stages of bloom.   1. Strip off leaves so the bottom 6 inches of the flowers' stems are bare. 2. Gather a few tulips at a time, holding in one hand. 3. Add about 3-5 tulips at a time, turning the bouquet each time you add them. 4. Keep an eye on the shape as you work. 5. Bind with floral tape (string will snap the stems). 6. Cover with ribbon.     Tulip Tips: The flowers will get limp the more they are worked- so handle with care! Tulips grow even after they are clipped. Keep it cool and refrigerated, away from drafts, food, and fruit. Make your bouquet a little tighter than you would like, since it will expand over night! It's best to buy tulips Jan-May and October-December. They are not in season in the summer and will wilt much faster.     Bridesmaid Bouquets: These garden-style bridesmaids bouquets are small, simple and sweet. Most of these flowers will be available January-May and October-December.     Recipe: 1 stem of cherry blossom 10 stems of ranunculus (some with buds and some in full bloom) 5 stems of sweet pea 3 stems of spirea 3 stems of open tulips     The How-To: Follow the same instructions as the tulip bouquet but add in taller stems, poking out above the rest. Add the sweet pea and cherry blossom last as it is quite delicate.     Tulip Boutonniere: 1.Cut the tulip so the stem is around 4-5 inches. 2. Take a leaf from a tulip and wrap it around the stem and blossom as shown in the photo. 3. Secure with floral tape. 4. Cover the tape by tying ribbon around it. 5. Don't forget the pins!     Tip: Again, keep refrigerated until use, away from drafts, food, and fruit. Food and fruit emit a gas that increases the speed of a flower's deterioration.     Orchid Wrist Corsage: Cymbidium orchids work best for this project and the result is a beautiful, effortless corsage. These corsages are great because you won't need to worry about putting pins into clothing. Cymbidiums are available almost all year long.     The How-To: 1. Cut the stem so it's about 5 inches long. 2. Cover the stem with floral tape. 3. Wrap ribbon around the stem and secure with a dot of glue (hot glue works best). 4. Take a long, wide ribbon and tie it in a double knot around the stem. 5. Tie the ribbon around the wrist, holding the flower flat against the top of the wrist.    
    1
  • Photos By: Mary Swenson     Simple, inexpensive clay pots can be turned into lovely little favors and centerpieces with just minimal effort and even less cash. Here's how!     To make the favors, we started with a small three-inch high pot. We cut the top off a plastic water bottle (make sure to keep the cap on), which fit perfectly inside as a liner for the pot.     Cut a piece of wet floral foam to fit inside the plastic liner.     Insert the liner and the foam into the pot, and fill the inside of the liner with water, so that the foam absorbs most of the water. The liner will ensure that the water stays away from the inside of the clay pot, preventing it from getting dark and wet (and, from leaking out of the hole that's in the bottom of most pots).     We purchased an inexpensive flower arrangement at a grocery store, cut out the flowers we wanted to use, and inserted the cut flowers into the foam. Since these favors will be going home with your guests, the foam will keep their arrangement intact during travel.     Our finished favor arrangement is sweet and simple!     Creating a matching centerpiece is even easier -- simply use a larger pot, and stick a cup of water inside the pot for your stems. We used the same flowers as we did for our favors, and added tulips for an extra touch.     The coordinating favors and centerpieces create a cohesive, beautiful look for your event!     To personalize your arrangements, print out guest names and table numbers on regular printer paper, cut into strips, and affix with double-sided tape or glue to the pots. So charming!  
    4
  • Photos By: Chelsea Fuss   Consider making the flower arrangements with friends and family a few days before the wedding. Have everyone bring flowers and herbs from their gardens and make an evening of it! This large wildflower arrangement will add the perfect charm to your food table and it's easy to make using just about any flowers from the garden.     You will need: A basket (we found this one for just $3.50 at Pier 1) Cellophane or plastic lining A water-tight container to fit inside the basket Floral tape Clippers     Directions: 1. Place the water-tight container inside the basket. Line with plastic if you are worried about it leaking.      2. Tape the floral tape across the bowl and secure tightly in a grid formation.     3. Start with the greens and the arching vines or twigs that will offer your arrangement shape. We started with greens and then the apple blossoms, using the curve of their stems to inspire the shape.     4. Make sure you are keeping the stems long enough so the flowers cover the rim of the basket.     5. Start filling in around the edges of the arrangement, these stems will provide support for the center flowers.     Larger blossoms look better at the base, with lighter, airy flowers placed toward the center and top of the arrangement.     Keep out of direct sunlight, away from drafts, and away from fruit until your big day.     Filler flowers are perfect for this arrangement. Here's a guide by season:   Spring: Apple blossom, forget-me-nots, candytuft, lilac, spirea, viburnum, jasmine, lily of the valley. Summer: Cosmos, nigella, queen anne's lace, herbs ,feverfew, butterfly bush, herbs and vegetable greens, fruit, berries. Fall: Dahlias, apple stems, herbs, crocosmia, pods and berries. Winter: Waxflower, ivy, salal, juniper, boxwood, bay.    
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