SHOW FILTERS
77

Flowers Wedding Ideas

  • Project and Photos By: Chelsea Fuss   Are you dreaming of a fragrant lilac bouquet for your wedding day? It’s easy to make your own but there are a few things you should know when working with lilacs. Here are some insider florist tips for working with these delicate spring flowers.     Always buy extra lilacs, Inevitably some of them will wilt early, as they are a very delicate flower. Buy twice as much as what you think you will need. Choose lilacs that are budded or just starting to open, because once you start arranging them, they will begin opening very quickly.     There are two ways to trim a lilac stem. It’s important to get this part right because the stems of lilacs are very woody and if they aren’t trimmed properly, they won’t drink water. You can use these tricks for other woody stemmed flowers like viburnum and cherry blossom.     You can snap the stem, which tears the stem open and allows it to absorb water easily. Just take two hands and break the stem in half.     You can also cut the stem at an angle with a pair of sharp clippers. Then, slice once or twice, straight up the stem as shown in the photo. Always cut between the nodes- the small bumps in the stems.     After you trim your lilacs, put them in a bucket of deep, lukewarm water for a few hours, in a cool, dark place, away from bright sunlight.     If you do encounter some wilted stems, make sure they have been trimmed and are resting in deep water. If they still wilt, submerge the whole flower in a bucket of hot water for a five minutes. Then, re-trim the stem and put the stem in a bucket of lukewarm water. Within a few hours, your lilac should be revived!     Before arranging, take as many leaves as possible off the stems, so the flower can use the water for the blossoms instead of the leaves. Strip the lower stems of any leaves or flowers, as those will create bacteria in the water and make the flowers die more quickly. Do leave a few leaves though on the upper end of a few stems, as they make a lovely accent in a bouquet.     Keep your bouquet in water right until it’s ready for use. It’d be extra smart to make two bouquets if you are getting married on a hot summer day. Have one waiting in a cool, dark place (perhaps in a fridge, away from food) in cool water. If your bouquet starts to fade, you can switch to a new bouquet half way through the day!     Lilacs are available in late spring, usually April-May. White lilacs are available from Holland as early as January, but will be much more expensive that time of year. If you are set on lilacs but their bloom time doesn’t coincide with your wedding date, consider these alternatives:   Butterfly Bush: a purple, summertime flower with a similar shape to the lilac. It usually comes in dark purple.   Hyacinth: This spring flower is available from greenhouses starting in December and available through May. They are much easier to secure ahead of time than lilacs. They are fragrant and have a similar shape to lilacs, though much smaller. They are available in pink, white, deep blue, lavender, and sometimes yellow.   Blooming Privet: This unusual flower comes from the common shrub, privet and is a gorgeous alternative to lilacs. Available in the late summer to early fall, the flowers aren’t fragrant but will certainly give your wedding the same feel as lilacs. They are available in white.   Happy flower arranging!  
    7
  • Project and Photos By: Chelsea Fuss   Add a splash of color with these vibrant bridesmaid's bouquets. Make them yourself for under $20 each!     Flowers: 5 stems orange ranunculus or iceland poppies 2 kumquats 1 hyacinth 8 stems of daffodils 3 stems of snowdrops (you might want to snip them from a plant if they are difficult to find at your florist)     Materials: ribbon twine clippers scissors floral tape water buckets vase     Step One: Start by taking the leaves off of the bottom of the stems.     Step Two: Hold a hyacinth and a few ranunculus in one hand.     Step Three: Add a few flowers, turning the bouquet each time you do.     Step Four: Use floral tape to attach each kumquat to a sturdy stem. Add them to the bouquet.     Step Five: Secure with twine.     Step Six: Make any adjustments, add flowers, and secure with twine again, if needed.     Floral Tip: Daffodils exude a sticky substance which is toxic if ingested, so if this bothers you or the person who will be carrying it, you may want to substitute tulips or roses or just make sure the stems are covered in ribbon. Always wash your hands after handling flowers and use common sense.    
    2
  • Project and Photos By: Chelsea Fuss   Old-fashioned garden roses are a romantic and fragrant addition to any summer wedding. Available May thru November, these roses are available in old-fashioned varieties as well as new varieties, the most popular being the David Austen brand of roses. Buy them when they are closed up, as they will quickly open as you arrange them. Here are three floral recipes that you can use to create anything from centerpieces to bouquets!     Recipe no. 1 For this recipe, we used a mix of pastel roses in apricot and yellow including Abraham Darby and Romantik Antike. Add pink peonies, unripe blueberries, chionthus, vine maple, and jasmine vine to finish.     Recipe no. 2 These gorgeous coral-hued arrangements features pink garden roses that are blown open.     Recipe no. 2 We added white phlox, mint, bay leaves, veronica, white scabiosa, blackberries, cranberry viburnum berries and chionthus. The peach garden rose is “Romantike Antike.”     Recipe no. 3 These casual mason jars create a summery, laid-back vibe. We added waxflowers to one, blackberries and dahlias to another, and a mix of red and pink garden roses- including Yves Piaget- and geranium to the third jar.     Recipe no. 3 The unripe blackberries are a darling summer twist and a wild contrast to the classic garden rose.  
    6
  • Photos By: Chelsea Fuss   We mixed our favorite spring flowers (lily of the valley + jasmine) three different ways for three different looks!     Recipe 1: Lily of the Valley and Jasmine wrapped in a piece of torn linen. A simple, sweet and very chic bouquet for a bride who loves fragrance.     Recipe 2: Here we mixed our Lily of the Valley and Jasmine with Quince blossoms, muscari and spring greens.     We tied it simply with twine. A charming bouquet for a bride who loves wildflowers and country style.   Recipe 3: For a more preppy/traditional style, we mixed the Lily of the Valley and Jasmine with mini daffodils, white hyacinth, muscari, viburnum and greens.     Tied with a fun blue and white striped ribbon, this is perfect for the bride who likes things a little more formal but still cheerful and bright! Show these photos to your florist for inspiration or make a bouquet on your own. Lily of the Valley and Jasmine are generally available January-April. Check your local florists and flower markets for details on your area!    
    2
  • Project and Photos by: Katelin Gallagher     I just love the look of a filled-to-the-brim centerpiece, but wanted to find a budget savvy way to get the look. With a little help from the floral department at Trader Joe's, I pulled off this bountiful $10 centerpiece!     Materials:  1/2 gallon wide mouth mason jars (about $2) A few stems of simple Greenery ($2) A bouquet of Maroon Mums ($3) 8 stems of white stock flowers - Matthiola Incana ($3) Scissors Water Total cost = $10!     Step One: Stock flowers are nice because they take up a lot of space and make the arrangement look nice and full. Using the height of your mason jar as a guide, cut the stems to make three heights. The flowers of the shortest stem should just peek over the top of the jar. The flowers of the longest stem will dictate the height of the arrangement. The middle length should be somewhere in between.     Step Two: Arrange the stock flowers in a mason jar filled with water. Make sure to strip any greenery below the water line. Place the tallest stems in the center, the mid-length stems evenly around the center and the short stems around the periphery.     Step Three: Then go for the mums! Follow roughly the same strategy as in step two, although it's better to cut and work them in one stem at a time.     Step Four: Finally, embellish the arrangement with greenery.     Ta-da! These will bloom pretty for several days. As long as the flowers are fresh, you can arrange them two days in advance. You'll just need to refresh the water.
    6
  • Project By: Janie Medley Photos By: Tori of Marvelous Things Photography     Ingredients: Carnations Sunflowers Seeded Eucalyptus Gladiolus Leucadendron Safari Sunset Ribbon Scissors Floral Tape Floral Pins     How To:   Clean the flower stems of extra leaves and give them a sharp angle cut and place them in water for a couple of hours so they can hydrate.  For this bouquet, I pulled the petals off the sunflowers to give the bouquet added texture.      Begin the design by crisscrossing the two stem of seeded eucalyptus and the sunflowers.     Start adding the other flowers and as you crisscross the stems, begin turning the bouquet and remember to hold the stems loosely in your hands to obtain the wild and just picked from the garden look and feel.       Once the bouquet is completed, you may want to stand in front of a mirror holding the bouquet to see where you need to add any flowers and to make any necessary adjustments to the bouquet.     Now you can tape the stems of the bouquet to hold them in place.     Give the stems a clip with the scissors to the length that you desire the bouquet to be.     Now wrap the handles with your desired ribbon and give the ribbon a cut if needed after wrapping.  Secure the ribbon in place with the floral pins.       Give the ribbon an extra touch with the addition of a smaller accent ribbon.       There you have it, a pretty DIY summer bouquet for around $60.00!     Enjoy!
    3
  • Project and Photos by Brittni Mehlhoff   Save money on wedding flowers by making the groom and groomsmen boutonnieres on your own. Using a combination of flowers from the grocery store and a few silk leaves, you can create these festive fall boutonnieres for about $3 a piece.      Aside from being inexpensive, they're very easy to make. It's a great activity to get bridesmaids involved in too, so you don't have to worry about a thing.   Supplies: Spray roses in fall colors (orange, mustard, or burgundy) Silk fall leaves Orange wax flowers String or twine Scissors

    How-To:

    1. Start by cutting the bottom of the silk leaf away to create a smaller leaf with with a longer stem.

      2. Then cut a small sprig from a larger wax flower branch and remove any flowers that are at the bottom of the stem.     3. Add the wax flower on top of the silk leaf, allowing the tip of the wax flower to rest just above the height of the silk leaf. Pinch with your fingertips just below the base of the leaf and wax flower bunch to hold everything in place while arranging.     4. Next add your spray roses at varying heights, allowing the wax flowers to peek through above the rose blooms.     5. Using a piece of string or twine about 8 inches long to make wrapping and tying easier, wrap the string around all the stems tightly three or four times. Then tie a double knot in the back before cutting off the excess string.     6. Now cut the end of all the stems to the same length about 1/2 - 1 inch below the wrapped string.       7. Add a small amount of water (less than an inch) to short glasses to keep boutonnieres fresh for up to 24 hours until the big day. Attach bout to lapel with a straight pin before the ceremony.

    10
  • Project by Janie Medley

    Photos by Tori Watson of Marvelous Things Photography

    Here's how to create a colorful, textured fall bouquet in a few simple steps.

    Ingredients: 

    Cleosia, also known as Coxcomb Ranunculus Sunflowers (I removed the yellow petals) Seeded Eucalyptus Velvet Ribbon Scissors Floral Tape Floral Pins

    Step One: Clean the flower stems of extra leaves and give them a sharp angle cut and place them in water for a couple of hours so they can hydrate.  For this bouquet, I pulled the petals off the sunflowers to give the bouquet added texture.

    Step Two: Begin the design by crisscrossing the celosia, the ranunculus and the sunflowers. Begin turning the bouquet after each fourth flower and once you have the bouquet designed to the size and look that you want, add a few stems of seeded eucalyptus to “cuff” the bouquet.

    Step Three: Tape the stems to secure the bouquet in place.

      Step Four: Cut the stems to your desired length.     Step Five: Wrap the stems with the velvet ribbon and secure the ribbon in place with a floral pin.     Step Six: Next, take extra ribbon and tie around the handle.     Step Seven: Secure the ribbon in place with 3 pearl pins and cut the ribbon ends at a diagonal.      Enjoy your gorgeous fall bouquet!  
    3
  • Project by Janie Medley Photos by Tori Watson of Marvelous Things Photography   Design a colorful dahlia bridal bouquet to carry on your wedding day in a few simple steps!       Ingredients:  Dahlias (3 different colors) Seeded Eucalyptus Velvet Ribbon Scissors Floral Tape Floral Pins     How To:   Step One: Clean the flower stems of extra leaves and give them a sharp angle cut and place them in water for a couple of hours so they can hydrate.  For this bouquet, I only designed with two types of flowers. I used one pack of dahlias in each color and one bundle of seeded eucalyptus.     Step Two: Since we are only designing with two types of flowers, I begin putting the bouquet together with two stems of the dahlias and next add in a few smaller stems of the seeded eucalyptus.       Just continue adding the stems of floral until you used all the stems of the dahlias. Stand in front of a mirror while designing and when the bouquet is at the point of how you would like it to look, it’s time to tape it together.       Step Three: Using floral tape (you can purchase this from any craft store) secure the stems together and once secured, cut the stems to the desired length.        Step Four: Wrap the stems with the velvet ribbon and secure the ribbon in place with a floral pin.      There you have it, a pretty bouquet using only two types of flowers!  
    2
  • Project by Janie Medley  Photos by Tori of Marvelous Things Photography   The perfect centerpiece for a garden theme wedding or dinner at your home. After the event, you can use the potted pansies as favors. How beautiful these would be on a farm table lined down the center of the table. This centerpiece could also be used as the escort card table decor!       Ingredients:  Pansies – purchased at the garden center Terra Cotta pots – purchased at local craft store Sheet moss – purchased at the garden center Container – I used a vintage Pepsi Crate I purchased from Crate and Barrel     How To: This DIY is so easy to make and so much fun!    Step One: Fill the container with the sheet moss     Step Two: Repot the pansies in the terra cotta pots.       Step Three: Place the terra cotta pots in the container among the moss.  Also, place the moss around the top of the pots to cover up the soil.       There you have it!!
    1
  • Project and Photos By: Chelsea Fuss   Are you dreaming of a fragrant lilac bouquet for your wedding day? It’s easy to make your own but there are a few things you should know when working with lilacs. Here are some insider florist tips for working with these delicate spring flowers.     Always buy extra lilacs, Inevitably some of them will wilt early, as they are a very delicate flower. Buy twice as much as what you think you will need. Choose lilacs that are budded or just starting to open, because once you start arranging them, they will begin opening very quickly.     There are two ways to trim a lilac stem. It’s important to get this part right because the stems of lilacs are very woody and if they aren’t trimmed properly, they won’t drink water. You can use these tricks for other woody stemmed flowers like viburnum and cherry blossom.     You can snap the stem, which tears the stem open and allows it to absorb water easily. Just take two hands and break the stem in half.     You can also cut the stem at an angle with a pair of sharp clippers. Then, slice once or twice, straight up the stem as shown in the photo. Always cut between the nodes- the small bumps in the stems.     After you trim your lilacs, put them in a bucket of deep, lukewarm water for a few hours, in a cool, dark place, away from bright sunlight.     If you do encounter some wilted stems, make sure they have been trimmed and are resting in deep water. If they still wilt, submerge the whole flower in a bucket of hot water for a five minutes. Then, re-trim the stem and put the stem in a bucket of lukewarm water. Within a few hours, your lilac should be revived!     Before arranging, take as many leaves as possible off the stems, so the flower can use the water for the blossoms instead of the leaves. Strip the lower stems of any leaves or flowers, as those will create bacteria in the water and make the flowers die more quickly. Do leave a few leaves though on the upper end of a few stems, as they make a lovely accent in a bouquet.     Keep your bouquet in water right until it’s ready for use. It’d be extra smart to make two bouquets if you are getting married on a hot summer day. Have one waiting in a cool, dark place (perhaps in a fridge, away from food) in cool water. If your bouquet starts to fade, you can switch to a new bouquet half way through the day!     Lilacs are available in late spring, usually April-May. White lilacs are available from Holland as early as January, but will be much more expensive that time of year. If you are set on lilacs but their bloom time doesn’t coincide with your wedding date, consider these alternatives:   Butterfly Bush: a purple, summertime flower with a similar shape to the lilac. It usually comes in dark purple.   Hyacinth: This spring flower is available from greenhouses starting in December and available through May. They are much easier to secure ahead of time than lilacs. They are fragrant and have a similar shape to lilacs, though much smaller. They are available in pink, white, deep blue, lavender, and sometimes yellow.   Blooming Privet: This unusual flower comes from the common shrub, privet and is a gorgeous alternative to lilacs. Available in the late summer to early fall, the flowers aren’t fragrant but will certainly give your wedding the same feel as lilacs. They are available in white.   Happy flower arranging!  
    7
  • Project and Photos By: Chelsea Fuss   Add a splash of color with these vibrant bridesmaid's bouquets. Make them yourself for under $20 each!     Flowers: 5 stems orange ranunculus or iceland poppies 2 kumquats 1 hyacinth 8 stems of daffodils 3 stems of snowdrops (you might want to snip them from a plant if they are difficult to find at your florist)     Materials: ribbon twine clippers scissors floral tape water buckets vase     Step One: Start by taking the leaves off of the bottom of the stems.     Step Two: Hold a hyacinth and a few ranunculus in one hand.     Step Three: Add a few flowers, turning the bouquet each time you do.     Step Four: Use floral tape to attach each kumquat to a sturdy stem. Add them to the bouquet.     Step Five: Secure with twine.     Step Six: Make any adjustments, add flowers, and secure with twine again, if needed.     Floral Tip: Daffodils exude a sticky substance which is toxic if ingested, so if this bothers you or the person who will be carrying it, you may want to substitute tulips or roses or just make sure the stems are covered in ribbon. Always wash your hands after handling flowers and use common sense.    
    2
  • Project and Photos By: Chelsea Fuss   Old-fashioned garden roses are a romantic and fragrant addition to any summer wedding. Available May thru November, these roses are available in old-fashioned varieties as well as new varieties, the most popular being the David Austen brand of roses. Buy them when they are closed up, as they will quickly open as you arrange them. Here are three floral recipes that you can use to create anything from centerpieces to bouquets!     Recipe no. 1 For this recipe, we used a mix of pastel roses in apricot and yellow including Abraham Darby and Romantik Antike. Add pink peonies, unripe blueberries, chionthus, vine maple, and jasmine vine to finish.     Recipe no. 2 These gorgeous coral-hued arrangements features pink garden roses that are blown open.     Recipe no. 2 We added white phlox, mint, bay leaves, veronica, white scabiosa, blackberries, cranberry viburnum berries and chionthus. The peach garden rose is “Romantike Antike.”     Recipe no. 3 These casual mason jars create a summery, laid-back vibe. We added waxflowers to one, blackberries and dahlias to another, and a mix of red and pink garden roses- including Yves Piaget- and geranium to the third jar.     Recipe no. 3 The unripe blackberries are a darling summer twist and a wild contrast to the classic garden rose.  
    6
  • Photos By: Chelsea Fuss   We mixed our favorite spring flowers (lily of the valley + jasmine) three different ways for three different looks!     Recipe 1: Lily of the Valley and Jasmine wrapped in a piece of torn linen. A simple, sweet and very chic bouquet for a bride who loves fragrance.     Recipe 2: Here we mixed our Lily of the Valley and Jasmine with Quince blossoms, muscari and spring greens.     We tied it simply with twine. A charming bouquet for a bride who loves wildflowers and country style.   Recipe 3: For a more preppy/traditional style, we mixed the Lily of the Valley and Jasmine with mini daffodils, white hyacinth, muscari, viburnum and greens.     Tied with a fun blue and white striped ribbon, this is perfect for the bride who likes things a little more formal but still cheerful and bright! Show these photos to your florist for inspiration or make a bouquet on your own. Lily of the Valley and Jasmine are generally available January-April. Check your local florists and flower markets for details on your area!    
    2
  • Project and Photos by: Katelin Gallagher     I just love the look of a filled-to-the-brim centerpiece, but wanted to find a budget savvy way to get the look. With a little help from the floral department at Trader Joe's, I pulled off this bountiful $10 centerpiece!     Materials:  1/2 gallon wide mouth mason jars (about $2) A few stems of simple Greenery ($2) A bouquet of Maroon Mums ($3) 8 stems of white stock flowers - Matthiola Incana ($3) Scissors Water Total cost = $10!     Step One: Stock flowers are nice because they take up a lot of space and make the arrangement look nice and full. Using the height of your mason jar as a guide, cut the stems to make three heights. The flowers of the shortest stem should just peek over the top of the jar. The flowers of the longest stem will dictate the height of the arrangement. The middle length should be somewhere in between.     Step Two: Arrange the stock flowers in a mason jar filled with water. Make sure to strip any greenery below the water line. Place the tallest stems in the center, the mid-length stems evenly around the center and the short stems around the periphery.     Step Three: Then go for the mums! Follow roughly the same strategy as in step two, although it's better to cut and work them in one stem at a time.     Step Four: Finally, embellish the arrangement with greenery.     Ta-da! These will bloom pretty for several days. As long as the flowers are fresh, you can arrange them two days in advance. You'll just need to refresh the water.
    6
  • Project By: Janie Medley Photos By: Tori of Marvelous Things Photography     Ingredients: Carnations Sunflowers Seeded Eucalyptus Gladiolus Leucadendron Safari Sunset Ribbon Scissors Floral Tape Floral Pins     How To:   Clean the flower stems of extra leaves and give them a sharp angle cut and place them in water for a couple of hours so they can hydrate.  For this bouquet, I pulled the petals off the sunflowers to give the bouquet added texture.      Begin the design by crisscrossing the two stem of seeded eucalyptus and the sunflowers.     Start adding the other flowers and as you crisscross the stems, begin turning the bouquet and remember to hold the stems loosely in your hands to obtain the wild and just picked from the garden look and feel.       Once the bouquet is completed, you may want to stand in front of a mirror holding the bouquet to see where you need to add any flowers and to make any necessary adjustments to the bouquet.     Now you can tape the stems of the bouquet to hold them in place.     Give the stems a clip with the scissors to the length that you desire the bouquet to be.     Now wrap the handles with your desired ribbon and give the ribbon a cut if needed after wrapping.  Secure the ribbon in place with the floral pins.       Give the ribbon an extra touch with the addition of a smaller accent ribbon.       There you have it, a pretty DIY summer bouquet for around $60.00!     Enjoy!
    3
  • Project and Photos by Brittni Mehlhoff   Save money on wedding flowers by making the groom and groomsmen boutonnieres on your own. Using a combination of flowers from the grocery store and a few silk leaves, you can create these festive fall boutonnieres for about $3 a piece.      Aside from being inexpensive, they're very easy to make. It's a great activity to get bridesmaids involved in too, so you don't have to worry about a thing.   Supplies: Spray roses in fall colors (orange, mustard, or burgundy) Silk fall leaves Orange wax flowers String or twine Scissors

    How-To:

    1. Start by cutting the bottom of the silk leaf away to create a smaller leaf with with a longer stem.

      2. Then cut a small sprig from a larger wax flower branch and remove any flowers that are at the bottom of the stem.     3. Add the wax flower on top of the silk leaf, allowing the tip of the wax flower to rest just above the height of the silk leaf. Pinch with your fingertips just below the base of the leaf and wax flower bunch to hold everything in place while arranging.     4. Next add your spray roses at varying heights, allowing the wax flowers to peek through above the rose blooms.     5. Using a piece of string or twine about 8 inches long to make wrapping and tying easier, wrap the string around all the stems tightly three or four times. Then tie a double knot in the back before cutting off the excess string.     6. Now cut the end of all the stems to the same length about 1/2 - 1 inch below the wrapped string.       7. Add a small amount of water (less than an inch) to short glasses to keep boutonnieres fresh for up to 24 hours until the big day. Attach bout to lapel with a straight pin before the ceremony.

    10
  • Project by Janie Medley

    Photos by Tori Watson of Marvelous Things Photography

    Here's how to create a colorful, textured fall bouquet in a few simple steps.

    Ingredients: 

    Cleosia, also known as Coxcomb Ranunculus Sunflowers (I removed the yellow petals) Seeded Eucalyptus Velvet Ribbon Scissors Floral Tape Floral Pins

    Step One: Clean the flower stems of extra leaves and give them a sharp angle cut and place them in water for a couple of hours so they can hydrate.  For this bouquet, I pulled the petals off the sunflowers to give the bouquet added texture.

    Step Two: Begin the design by crisscrossing the celosia, the ranunculus and the sunflowers. Begin turning the bouquet after each fourth flower and once you have the bouquet designed to the size and look that you want, add a few stems of seeded eucalyptus to “cuff” the bouquet.

    Step Three: Tape the stems to secure the bouquet in place.

      Step Four: Cut the stems to your desired length.     Step Five: Wrap the stems with the velvet ribbon and secure the ribbon in place with a floral pin.     Step Six: Next, take extra ribbon and tie around the handle.     Step Seven: Secure the ribbon in place with 3 pearl pins and cut the ribbon ends at a diagonal.      Enjoy your gorgeous fall bouquet!  
    3
  • Project by Janie Medley Photos by Tori Watson of Marvelous Things Photography   Design a colorful dahlia bridal bouquet to carry on your wedding day in a few simple steps!       Ingredients:  Dahlias (3 different colors) Seeded Eucalyptus Velvet Ribbon Scissors Floral Tape Floral Pins     How To:   Step One: Clean the flower stems of extra leaves and give them a sharp angle cut and place them in water for a couple of hours so they can hydrate.  For this bouquet, I only designed with two types of flowers. I used one pack of dahlias in each color and one bundle of seeded eucalyptus.     Step Two: Since we are only designing with two types of flowers, I begin putting the bouquet together with two stems of the dahlias and next add in a few smaller stems of the seeded eucalyptus.       Just continue adding the stems of floral until you used all the stems of the dahlias. Stand in front of a mirror while designing and when the bouquet is at the point of how you would like it to look, it’s time to tape it together.       Step Three: Using floral tape (you can purchase this from any craft store) secure the stems together and once secured, cut the stems to the desired length.        Step Four: Wrap the stems with the velvet ribbon and secure the ribbon in place with a floral pin.      There you have it, a pretty bouquet using only two types of flowers!  
    2
  • Project by Janie Medley  Photos by Tori of Marvelous Things Photography   The perfect centerpiece for a garden theme wedding or dinner at your home. After the event, you can use the potted pansies as favors. How beautiful these would be on a farm table lined down the center of the table. This centerpiece could also be used as the escort card table decor!       Ingredients:  Pansies – purchased at the garden center Terra Cotta pots – purchased at local craft store Sheet moss – purchased at the garden center Container – I used a vintage Pepsi Crate I purchased from Crate and Barrel     How To: This DIY is so easy to make and so much fun!    Step One: Fill the container with the sheet moss     Step Two: Repot the pansies in the terra cotta pots.       Step Three: Place the terra cotta pots in the container among the moss.  Also, place the moss around the top of the pots to cover up the soil.       There you have it!!
    1

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