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DIY Wedding Ideas

  • So I was trying to figure out how you get the tissues in the envelope...like what size you buy and all that, when I ran across this article over on weddingbee (Mrs. Sunrise)

    I have a fascination with Tears of Joy tissues, so I’m going to show you how I made my own.

    First, let’s talk about the materials that I used…

    Small glassine envelopes: glassine is a very thin and translucent type of paper which is similar to vellum, except glassine is water resistant (as well as air and grease resistant). If you have bought postage stamps from the post office before, that is what they put your stamps in.

    They are relatively cheap and can be purchased from a paper store. I purchased my glassine envelopes from eBay in the #3 size, which measures 4¼” x 2½”.

    Then I bought some personalized rectangle labels from beaucoup.com.

    [source]

    The kind that I bought is called Summer Garden and measures 2½” x 1¼”. I ordered my labels in pale pink.

    [source]

    My package from beaucoup arrived quickly. Hmm… I wonder what is inside?

     

    Can you guess?

    My labels, of course!!

    I was pleased with how they turned out.

    Equipped with some coupons, I went to Jo-Ann’s and scored some pretty pink & green ribbon.

    I just used regular ol’ pocket Kleenex. They fit in the envelopes perfectly.

     

    I figured that 2 sheets of tissue per envelope was enough to wipe away some happy tears. 

     

    Bridesmaid N happened to be in town one weekend so I immediately put her to work stuffing the envelopes. We were being neat freaks and taking our time so it took a lot longer than it should have, but it’s nice to have some help because it cuts the workload in half. After Bridesmaid N left, I finished up the envelopes with the labels and ribbon. Here are the six easy steps:

    1) Cut the ribbon into 7″ strips and set them aside.

     

    2) Turn the stuffed envelope over and stick a label to the flap.

    3) Flip it back over and affix a ribbon to one end of the label.

    4) Close the flap and press down the right side of the label while leaving the left side of the label up.

     

    5) Pull the ribbon around the back of the envelope and bring it around to the left side of the raised label.

    6) Tuck it under the label and press down. Voila! All done.

    This is what the other side of the finished tissue packets look like.

    And there you have it. Simple and neat.

    If you decide to make your own, please show me! I would love to see how great yours turn out.

     

    0
  • Copy, paste, and edit your article here. The text from the topic is reproduced below for your convenience:

    DIY Hand Painted Family Sign by Addicted 2 Decorationg.

    Another great DIY project from Kristi!  I think this will be my next project instead buying a sign from Etsy. 



    1. Using my hand held circular saw, I cut pieces of MDF to the desired sizes.

    2. Next, I painted two coats of primer on the MDF. And then I used one coat of the base color. I just used some leftover wall paint in a satin finish.


    4. Next, I took my sign lettering that was printed out from my computer, and taped the sections together . I then cut away all of the extra blank paper around the edges of the lettering.


    5. Using a #2 pencil, I "colored" the back side of the sign lettering. I went over it a couple of times to assure that it was well-coated.

    6. Once it was coated well, I placed the lettering right-side-up on the painted MDF. I used a ruler to make sure the lettering was straight across.


    7. And then I used a sharp pencil to trace the lettering onto the MDF.



    8. Once everything was traced, I was ready to start painting. I used tiny round craft brushes, and an assortment of paint colors of Behr sample paint pots in a matte finish.


    9. The swirlies at the top I actually painted first with a light aqua color. I hated how it looked with the yellow, so I went back to Home Depot and got a deeper color. However, it happened to be a very happy accident that I had that lighter color underneath the darker color.

    10. After everything was painted, it still looked horrible, so I got a big fat Sharpie marker (a Super Sharpie with a pointed tip), and started randomly outlining various parts of the lettering, thinking it would make it "pop". It just made it look cheap. But determined to see it through to the end, I continued to outline, but the more I did, the more careless I got. Still, I was convinced that it was headed for the dumpster.

    11. Knowing that it couldn't get any worse, I decided to give one last idea a try--giving it an aged look with some sandpaper. I used 150 grit sandpaper and just started sanding (manually--not with my electric sander), and right before my eyes, a miracle occurred.

    So that's it! Well, I attached the two sections with some eye screws...and then it was finished!!

     

    0
  • Not sure how to trim down your wedding budget? No one will notice if you don'thave these extra wedding frills

    By: Sharon Naylor

     



    Photo by Festivities Event

    EXTRA CEREMONY DECOR: Skip altar flowers, pew decorations, swags of fabric and a custom-designed aisle runner to save a bit. Besides, your guests will spend the majority of the wedding at the reception.

    VANITY RECEPTION DECOR: Do you really need to splurge on having your names spelled out in roses on the lawn? Do you need silk table runners, imprinted with your names and wedding date? Probably not, even if you really, really want it. Skip a custom-designed monogram projected on the dance floor in favor of clustered candles and votives to provide the same glowing ambiance.

    AN ORNATELY DESIGNED CAKE: Don’t spend hundreds of dollars on sugarpaste flowers, butterflies, piped-on pearls or a replica of the lace pattern on your dress. The amount of labor the cake requires generally determines its cost, so opt for sleek, clean lines and minimal extras.

    SOUPED-UP INVITATIONS: Check out a discount site like invitations4sale.com for 40% off, or use software and paper from mountaincow.com to make your own items for much less.

    HIGH-END TRANSPORTATION: It’s expensive to rent limousines, classic cars and party buses, plus overtime charges can pile up. Instead, decorate your own or your friends’ cars, convertibles or even minivans for fun rides to the ceremony and reception. If you can't live without the limo, hire just two: one for you, one for the parents.

    OVER-THE-TOP ENTERTAINMENT: Generally speaking, DJs cost significantly less than  bands, but if you insist on live performance, look for a group with just three musicians who can play different instruments. Or program your iPod with your favorite tunes—just make sure the venue is equipped with good speakers.

    FRIVOLOUS FAVORS: Treat your guests to edibles, like cookies or chocolates, with DIY labels that show guests how much time you (and your fiancé) put into them. Or try packets of flower seeds from Home Depot or Lowes—they retail for around $2 each. Feeling gratuitous? Make charitable donations in your guests’ names, providing is a tasteful and cost-effective solution to what to give.

     

    1
  • Photos and Project Creation by Victoria Hudgins


    Leave your guests with a scrumptious snack for the morning time and they will be pleased they stayed up to party with you the night before!  Hand out gifts of your favorite mini-loaf wrapped up with the world's best butter drizzle.



     


    Ingredients & Materials

    Mini loafs of bread- one per guest or family, brown butcher paper and kitchen twine for wrapping, honey, cinnamon, nutmeg, butter, and small jars to store the drizzle (I found mine in packs of four at Ikea). 


     


     


    Step One

    Make your mini loaves the week prior and store them in air tight containers. Use your favorite recipe or one from a box.  I made mine from a box mix and got quite a few compliments when serving the bread. If you have a special family recipe, it's a perfect opportunity to pass it along!


     


    Step Two

    Wrap the mini loaves in brown butcher paper and tie with kitchen twine.



     


    Step Three

    The buttery drizzle is really the special favor for your guests; it is sure to liven up their morning. To make one serving, combine 1 tablespoon of melted butter with a hearty drizzle of honey, 1/2 a teaspoon of cinnamon, and 1/2 a teaspoon of nutmeg.



     


    Step Four

    Store the buttery drizzle in glass jars and package with the bread.  Be sure to put a 'warm up and stir before using' note along with the package and maybe even include a printout of the recipes. 


     

    0
  • An article from my wedding blog I thought I'd share with you:

    I always knew I wanted the classy elegance of hand-written calligraphy on our wedding invitations. Unfortunately, $2.00 per envelope for our 100 invitations didn't exactly fit the bill. I've spent many hours drooling over the designs of calligraphers such as Laura Hooper and Heather Victoria Held (if only I had half of her talent, just half!), wishing I could afford their exquisite services.

    I've always been artistic by nature, and my handwriting is probably better than average, but it is certainly not calligraphy-caliber. Nonetheless, I couldn't bear to settle for computer-printed envelopes or even worse, sticker address labels (gasp!). So, I decided to give it a shot on my own! Here's a little sample of how my first few envelopes turned out...

    Not too bad, huh? Well, I have a little confession to make.

    I totally cheated!! Yes, this is my real handwriting -- but I had a little help. If you're a Food Network junkie like me, you're probably familiar with Sandra Lee's Semi-Homemade tactic. She prepares elaborate meals using shortcuts and help from pre-prepared foods. That way, you think she spent all day slaving in the kitchen, but it really took her less than an hour. My extreme perfectionism meant that I couldn't possibly hand-address 100+ envelopes without some consistency and guidance. I would have wasted so much paper trying to do all 100 perfectly! So I took a hint from Ms. Lee and came up with my very own shortcut. It's very similar to my aisle tiles strategy!

    Let me share with you a step-by-step guide to your own semi-homemade calligraphy:

    I'm using cocoa Euroflap envelopes from envelopemall.com. Obviously, black ink wouldn't show up very well, so I bought white India Ink from the craft store. I also purchased a calligraphy pen and fine-tip nibs. I love the sharp and unexpected contrast of the white ink on dark brown paper.

    Next, I set up MS Word using the mailings feature to print addresses on the size envelope I was using.

    Then I entered the first recipient's address and set the font color to brown, just a few shades lighter than the envelope color. I adjusted the printer settings for my 5.25 x 7.25" envelope, and printed the address directly onto the envelope. This took a little more time and practice envelopes than I expected to get the position right, but I finally wiggled it around and got it centered.

    Then, I traced over the address using my white ink and calligraphy pen. You need very good lighting for this step, because the brown ink on brown paper was difficult to see. The brown-on-brown ensures nobody will be able to see if I don't cover the printed lines exactly (except you guys, of course). It actually took two coats of ink to get the right amount of coverage, since the white ink was a little bit opaque.

    While this shortcut was extremely helpful, it still required a bit of finesse while figuring out how to use the calligraphy pen and bottled ink. You need to position the pen at an angle to produce the thinner and thicker lines within the letters, and adjusting the pressure on the pen controls the amount of ink that's released from the nib. I would definitely suggest a few practice runs before you start on your envelopes.

    This technique would also work well with any other ink and paper color combination, and gives that fancy hand-written feeling without the worry of crooked lines or inconsistent lettering.

     

    1
  • {{SOURCE: Lost my Kitty}}

    What you will need:


    Craft paper 4” square
    Fabric leaves 2”
    Skeleton Leaves 2”
    Adhesive Glue
    Scissors
    Needle and Thread

     

    Instructions:

    Step 1: Draw a spiral on a 4 inch square. I’ve used 90 weight paper purchased at Jarrold’s though regular coloured craft paper would work equally well.

    Step 2: Cut out the spiral along the lines you’ve drawn. If you’re really clever, cut out the spiral freehand. It will keep you from hunting down an eraser as I forced my husband to do for me.

    Step 3: Roll the spiral from the outside.
    Step 4: Use a spot of adhesive to glue the body of the flower onto the round bit left.

    Now you’re finished with the flower!
    Step 5: Use a pencil to faintly write your guests’ names in a pretty cursive. I’ve used pen for emphasis and don’t forget the table number for escort cards.

    Step 6: Follow the lines using small stitches. You could also use paper if you are not so keen on sewing.

    Step 7: Attach the skeleton leaf and your personalised leaf to the flower.

     

    0
  • These wedding favors are the gift that keeps on growing! They're easy to put together -- here's how to create your very own seedling kits:




    What you'll need:



    Supplies:
    (1) Kraft box, Michaels, $1 each
    (2) Moss, Michaels, ranging from $3 to $5 a bag
    (3) Vellum, Michaels, $9.99 for 50 sheets
    (4) Antique seam binding, flea market
    (5) Soil pellets, seasonally found at Target, search online retailers for          larger quanities
    (6) 1" Diameter Terracotta Pot, approximately $1
    (7) Forget-Me-Not seeds, $1 per packet
    (8) Paper sacks, Michaels, about $3 per package of 25
    (9) Miniature tags
    (10) Embroidery floss, $.39 per skein
    (11) Cover weight card stock, $.89 per sheet


    Instructions:

    Step One:


    Fill a miniature paper bag (8) with a soil pellet (5) and a sprinkling of seeds (7). Embellish as desired - here we used antique seam binding (4), a miniature tag (9) and embroidery floss (10). Simpler alternative: seal bag with a sticker or label.

    Step Two:


    Print a monogram, logo or thank-you message on a sheet of heavy card stock (11). The card stock should be long enough to wrap around the kraft paper box (1). Create a matchbox-style lid by folding the cardstock around the box. Use a bone folder to make creases sharp and professional, and glue ends together using a glue stick. Simpler alternative: use a box with attached lid and apply a decorative label or stamp.

    Step Three:


    Line box with sheet moss (2) and place miniature terracotta pot (6) and seed/soil packet inside. Print care and planting instructions on a sheet of vellum (3) and trim so it fits snugly within the box; replace lid.

    2
  • Give your wedding a beachy feel with a linen and white color scheme. Our inspiration was Queen Anne's Lace, which grows along the roadsides in late summer and offer a beautiful creamy color to a wedding. We gathered a bunch and plunked it into a cream colored handmade ceramic container, barely arranging it to give it a wild feel. We covered the table in linen and used white linen napkins tied with brown + white striped ribbon and a blossom to decorate the plates. We would recommend dark wood chairs or white, depending on your setting. This table is full of impact but a cinch to pull together! Your guests will enjoy this fresh take, on the traditional white wedding!

     

     

     

     

     

    0
  • I've had quite a few of my bride friends that have reached out to me asking about my DIY Accordion Program.  

     

     

     

     

    Taking inspiration from Martha Stewart, I started working on a mock-up of our accordion programs. I love the compact aspect of the programs and the fact that it's so different than what you normally see at weddings. :) Here's the Martha Stewart accordion program:

     

     

     

     

    For so long, I've admired the programs but often wondered about the manual labor involved with putting them together. Well, yesterday, I got my answer as I worked on our mock-up. Honestly, I was really surprised at how easy it was to put these together and-even more-I enjoyed the project.

     

     

    Our mock-ups are larger the the MS programs, mainly because I knew we will have older people at our weddings and I didn't want the words to be too small. Still, ours fit in the palm of your hand! :) Here's our mock-up:

     

     

    I have the ribbon glued (with double-sided tape) to the back of the program so the ribbon won't go flying everywhere when people open them.

     

     

     

     

     

     

    One of my favorite parts of the program. The simple back page, with a quote from "The Notebook". This is one project I am extremely proud of! I love how ours turned out and-as elements in the program are glued down-I will start putting batches together at a time.

     

     

     

     

     


    You'll need the following: Card stock paper for your cover (8.5" x 11" will be enough for 6 if you line it up right)

     

     


    Accordion template


    Rubber cement glue (or 2-sided tape, your choice)


    Scissors


    Paper-cutter (optional if you're good with cutting straight lines) Ribbon


    Here are the instructions I followed:


    Visit Jody Prose for her FREE templates (click on "accordion fold" program) Click HERE!

    Fill in template and print (most home printers can’t print tabloid pages, however, nearly all kinkos, mailboxes, etc and staples can) Make sure when packing the files on cd/memory stick, that you include a copy of all the fonts you have selected so that you can ensure that your file will print out exactly as you intended.

    Cut sheet in half so you have 2 programs.

    Fold sheet into quarters. To make your folds crisper, use a ruler and a non-serrated butter knife to crease the folds before you actually fold the pages.

    If you used all 8 cells for your program, you’ll need to attach the two pages together. Use rubber cement, a glue stick, or double sided tape to do so. You should have a long accordion at this point.

    Print the Accordion Program Cover and cut in half. Score and fold so that you have a 4.25”x5.5” cover. Using glue dots, rubber cement or a glue stick. Attach the one end of your accordion to the inside cover. Do the same for the outside cover. Repeat for the rest of your programs.
    ***********************************************

    Those are the actual instructions included on the template that you'll download. Here are my extra 2 cents:




    Print a few in black & white and a few in color. You can use the b&w copies for your first few tries & the colors for your final mock-up.
    I cannot stress enough, if you have downloaded fonts, how important it is to have those same fonts on the computer you're printing from. Kinko's didn't have my fonts so I had to think fast & find something suitable.
     
    You'll need a nice card stock paper for your cover. I decided to stay toned down for the cover because the damask was pretty busy inside.

    If you are going to include a ribbon like I did, you'll need to attach it to the back of the program with glue/tape, etc. It's the easiest way to ensure ribbons aren't left everywhere after people open them.

    Play with the size of your cover. I don't know the specific size of my cover, but I played with the size of it until I felt comfortable.

     

    If I don't count the time it took to print, the assembly of the program took {maybe} 5-7 minutes for each program. Not bad when Law & Order is on. This would be a GREAT DIY party project.

    CIAO


    Ebonee Monique

     

    1
  • By: Danyelle Mathews


    Do you have friends and family traveling great distances to attend your big day? If so, you might consider putting together little favor bags to welcome them when they arrive. You can include an itinerary for the festivities, some favorite treats and even personalized stationery to help them feel welcomed and appreciated.


    You will need: fabric drawstring bags, freezer paper, x-acto knife, pencil, paint, fabric medium, initial template, foam paintbrush, iron, small bowl   



     


    Step One

    Trace a monogram print-out to the freezer paper using a pencil. (Tip- here is great resource for unique fonts) 



     


    Step Two 

    Carefully cut out the monogram with the x-acto knife. 



     


    Step Three

    With your iron, adhere the monogram template to the drawstring bag. Once the template is adhered, mix two parts paint to one part fabric medium in a small bowl.



     


    Step Four 

    Carefully paint over the monogram template.




    Once the paint is dry, remove the template and fill your bag with your chosen treats. You can use this same idea to create favors or gift bags for your bridesmaids and groomsmen.

    4
  • So I was trying to figure out how you get the tissues in the envelope...like what size you buy and all that, when I ran across this article over on weddingbee (Mrs. Sunrise)

    I have a fascination with Tears of Joy tissues, so I’m going to show you how I made my own.

    First, let’s talk about the materials that I used…

    Small glassine envelopes: glassine is a very thin and translucent type of paper which is similar to vellum, except glassine is water resistant (as well as air and grease resistant). If you have bought postage stamps from the post office before, that is what they put your stamps in.

    They are relatively cheap and can be purchased from a paper store. I purchased my glassine envelopes from eBay in the #3 size, which measures 4¼” x 2½”.

    Then I bought some personalized rectangle labels from beaucoup.com.

    [source]

    The kind that I bought is called Summer Garden and measures 2½” x 1¼”. I ordered my labels in pale pink.

    [source]

    My package from beaucoup arrived quickly. Hmm… I wonder what is inside?

     

    Can you guess?

    My labels, of course!!

    I was pleased with how they turned out.

    Equipped with some coupons, I went to Jo-Ann’s and scored some pretty pink & green ribbon.

    I just used regular ol’ pocket Kleenex. They fit in the envelopes perfectly.

     

    I figured that 2 sheets of tissue per envelope was enough to wipe away some happy tears. 

     

    Bridesmaid N happened to be in town one weekend so I immediately put her to work stuffing the envelopes. We were being neat freaks and taking our time so it took a lot longer than it should have, but it’s nice to have some help because it cuts the workload in half. After Bridesmaid N left, I finished up the envelopes with the labels and ribbon. Here are the six easy steps:

    1) Cut the ribbon into 7″ strips and set them aside.

     

    2) Turn the stuffed envelope over and stick a label to the flap.

    3) Flip it back over and affix a ribbon to one end of the label.

    4) Close the flap and press down the right side of the label while leaving the left side of the label up.

     

    5) Pull the ribbon around the back of the envelope and bring it around to the left side of the raised label.

    6) Tuck it under the label and press down. Voila! All done.

    This is what the other side of the finished tissue packets look like.

    And there you have it. Simple and neat.

    If you decide to make your own, please show me! I would love to see how great yours turn out.

     

    0
  • Copy, paste, and edit your article here. The text from the topic is reproduced below for your convenience:

    DIY Hand Painted Family Sign by Addicted 2 Decorationg.

    Another great DIY project from Kristi!  I think this will be my next project instead buying a sign from Etsy. 



    1. Using my hand held circular saw, I cut pieces of MDF to the desired sizes.

    2. Next, I painted two coats of primer on the MDF. And then I used one coat of the base color. I just used some leftover wall paint in a satin finish.


    4. Next, I took my sign lettering that was printed out from my computer, and taped the sections together . I then cut away all of the extra blank paper around the edges of the lettering.


    5. Using a #2 pencil, I "colored" the back side of the sign lettering. I went over it a couple of times to assure that it was well-coated.

    6. Once it was coated well, I placed the lettering right-side-up on the painted MDF. I used a ruler to make sure the lettering was straight across.


    7. And then I used a sharp pencil to trace the lettering onto the MDF.



    8. Once everything was traced, I was ready to start painting. I used tiny round craft brushes, and an assortment of paint colors of Behr sample paint pots in a matte finish.


    9. The swirlies at the top I actually painted first with a light aqua color. I hated how it looked with the yellow, so I went back to Home Depot and got a deeper color. However, it happened to be a very happy accident that I had that lighter color underneath the darker color.

    10. After everything was painted, it still looked horrible, so I got a big fat Sharpie marker (a Super Sharpie with a pointed tip), and started randomly outlining various parts of the lettering, thinking it would make it "pop". It just made it look cheap. But determined to see it through to the end, I continued to outline, but the more I did, the more careless I got. Still, I was convinced that it was headed for the dumpster.

    11. Knowing that it couldn't get any worse, I decided to give one last idea a try--giving it an aged look with some sandpaper. I used 150 grit sandpaper and just started sanding (manually--not with my electric sander), and right before my eyes, a miracle occurred.

    So that's it! Well, I attached the two sections with some eye screws...and then it was finished!!

     

    0
  • Not sure how to trim down your wedding budget? No one will notice if you don'thave these extra wedding frills

    By: Sharon Naylor

     



    Photo by Festivities Event

    EXTRA CEREMONY DECOR: Skip altar flowers, pew decorations, swags of fabric and a custom-designed aisle runner to save a bit. Besides, your guests will spend the majority of the wedding at the reception.

    VANITY RECEPTION DECOR: Do you really need to splurge on having your names spelled out in roses on the lawn? Do you need silk table runners, imprinted with your names and wedding date? Probably not, even if you really, really want it. Skip a custom-designed monogram projected on the dance floor in favor of clustered candles and votives to provide the same glowing ambiance.

    AN ORNATELY DESIGNED CAKE: Don’t spend hundreds of dollars on sugarpaste flowers, butterflies, piped-on pearls or a replica of the lace pattern on your dress. The amount of labor the cake requires generally determines its cost, so opt for sleek, clean lines and minimal extras.

    SOUPED-UP INVITATIONS: Check out a discount site like invitations4sale.com for 40% off, or use software and paper from mountaincow.com to make your own items for much less.

    HIGH-END TRANSPORTATION: It’s expensive to rent limousines, classic cars and party buses, plus overtime charges can pile up. Instead, decorate your own or your friends’ cars, convertibles or even minivans for fun rides to the ceremony and reception. If you can't live without the limo, hire just two: one for you, one for the parents.

    OVER-THE-TOP ENTERTAINMENT: Generally speaking, DJs cost significantly less than  bands, but if you insist on live performance, look for a group with just three musicians who can play different instruments. Or program your iPod with your favorite tunes—just make sure the venue is equipped with good speakers.

    FRIVOLOUS FAVORS: Treat your guests to edibles, like cookies or chocolates, with DIY labels that show guests how much time you (and your fiancé) put into them. Or try packets of flower seeds from Home Depot or Lowes—they retail for around $2 each. Feeling gratuitous? Make charitable donations in your guests’ names, providing is a tasteful and cost-effective solution to what to give.

     

    1
  • Photos and Project Creation by Victoria Hudgins


    Leave your guests with a scrumptious snack for the morning time and they will be pleased they stayed up to party with you the night before!  Hand out gifts of your favorite mini-loaf wrapped up with the world's best butter drizzle.



     


    Ingredients & Materials

    Mini loafs of bread- one per guest or family, brown butcher paper and kitchen twine for wrapping, honey, cinnamon, nutmeg, butter, and small jars to store the drizzle (I found mine in packs of four at Ikea). 


     


     


    Step One

    Make your mini loaves the week prior and store them in air tight containers. Use your favorite recipe or one from a box.  I made mine from a box mix and got quite a few compliments when serving the bread. If you have a special family recipe, it's a perfect opportunity to pass it along!


     


    Step Two

    Wrap the mini loaves in brown butcher paper and tie with kitchen twine.



     


    Step Three

    The buttery drizzle is really the special favor for your guests; it is sure to liven up their morning. To make one serving, combine 1 tablespoon of melted butter with a hearty drizzle of honey, 1/2 a teaspoon of cinnamon, and 1/2 a teaspoon of nutmeg.



     


    Step Four

    Store the buttery drizzle in glass jars and package with the bread.  Be sure to put a 'warm up and stir before using' note along with the package and maybe even include a printout of the recipes. 


     

    0
  • An article from my wedding blog I thought I'd share with you:

    I always knew I wanted the classy elegance of hand-written calligraphy on our wedding invitations. Unfortunately, $2.00 per envelope for our 100 invitations didn't exactly fit the bill. I've spent many hours drooling over the designs of calligraphers such as Laura Hooper and Heather Victoria Held (if only I had half of her talent, just half!), wishing I could afford their exquisite services.

    I've always been artistic by nature, and my handwriting is probably better than average, but it is certainly not calligraphy-caliber. Nonetheless, I couldn't bear to settle for computer-printed envelopes or even worse, sticker address labels (gasp!). So, I decided to give it a shot on my own! Here's a little sample of how my first few envelopes turned out...

    Not too bad, huh? Well, I have a little confession to make.

    I totally cheated!! Yes, this is my real handwriting -- but I had a little help. If you're a Food Network junkie like me, you're probably familiar with Sandra Lee's Semi-Homemade tactic. She prepares elaborate meals using shortcuts and help from pre-prepared foods. That way, you think she spent all day slaving in the kitchen, but it really took her less than an hour. My extreme perfectionism meant that I couldn't possibly hand-address 100+ envelopes without some consistency and guidance. I would have wasted so much paper trying to do all 100 perfectly! So I took a hint from Ms. Lee and came up with my very own shortcut. It's very similar to my aisle tiles strategy!

    Let me share with you a step-by-step guide to your own semi-homemade calligraphy:

    I'm using cocoa Euroflap envelopes from envelopemall.com. Obviously, black ink wouldn't show up very well, so I bought white India Ink from the craft store. I also purchased a calligraphy pen and fine-tip nibs. I love the sharp and unexpected contrast of the white ink on dark brown paper.

    Next, I set up MS Word using the mailings feature to print addresses on the size envelope I was using.

    Then I entered the first recipient's address and set the font color to brown, just a few shades lighter than the envelope color. I adjusted the printer settings for my 5.25 x 7.25" envelope, and printed the address directly onto the envelope. This took a little more time and practice envelopes than I expected to get the position right, but I finally wiggled it around and got it centered.

    Then, I traced over the address using my white ink and calligraphy pen. You need very good lighting for this step, because the brown ink on brown paper was difficult to see. The brown-on-brown ensures nobody will be able to see if I don't cover the printed lines exactly (except you guys, of course). It actually took two coats of ink to get the right amount of coverage, since the white ink was a little bit opaque.

    While this shortcut was extremely helpful, it still required a bit of finesse while figuring out how to use the calligraphy pen and bottled ink. You need to position the pen at an angle to produce the thinner and thicker lines within the letters, and adjusting the pressure on the pen controls the amount of ink that's released from the nib. I would definitely suggest a few practice runs before you start on your envelopes.

    This technique would also work well with any other ink and paper color combination, and gives that fancy hand-written feeling without the worry of crooked lines or inconsistent lettering.

     

    1
  • {{SOURCE: Lost my Kitty}}

    What you will need:


    Craft paper 4” square
    Fabric leaves 2”
    Skeleton Leaves 2”
    Adhesive Glue
    Scissors
    Needle and Thread

     

    Instructions:

    Step 1: Draw a spiral on a 4 inch square. I’ve used 90 weight paper purchased at Jarrold’s though regular coloured craft paper would work equally well.

    Step 2: Cut out the spiral along the lines you’ve drawn. If you’re really clever, cut out the spiral freehand. It will keep you from hunting down an eraser as I forced my husband to do for me.

    Step 3: Roll the spiral from the outside.
    Step 4: Use a spot of adhesive to glue the body of the flower onto the round bit left.

    Now you’re finished with the flower!
    Step 5: Use a pencil to faintly write your guests’ names in a pretty cursive. I’ve used pen for emphasis and don’t forget the table number for escort cards.

    Step 6: Follow the lines using small stitches. You could also use paper if you are not so keen on sewing.

    Step 7: Attach the skeleton leaf and your personalised leaf to the flower.

     

    0
  • These wedding favors are the gift that keeps on growing! They're easy to put together -- here's how to create your very own seedling kits:




    What you'll need:



    Supplies:
    (1) Kraft box, Michaels, $1 each
    (2) Moss, Michaels, ranging from $3 to $5 a bag
    (3) Vellum, Michaels, $9.99 for 50 sheets
    (4) Antique seam binding, flea market
    (5) Soil pellets, seasonally found at Target, search online retailers for          larger quanities
    (6) 1" Diameter Terracotta Pot, approximately $1
    (7) Forget-Me-Not seeds, $1 per packet
    (8) Paper sacks, Michaels, about $3 per package of 25
    (9) Miniature tags
    (10) Embroidery floss, $.39 per skein
    (11) Cover weight card stock, $.89 per sheet


    Instructions:

    Step One:


    Fill a miniature paper bag (8) with a soil pellet (5) and a sprinkling of seeds (7). Embellish as desired - here we used antique seam binding (4), a miniature tag (9) and embroidery floss (10). Simpler alternative: seal bag with a sticker or label.

    Step Two:


    Print a monogram, logo or thank-you message on a sheet of heavy card stock (11). The card stock should be long enough to wrap around the kraft paper box (1). Create a matchbox-style lid by folding the cardstock around the box. Use a bone folder to make creases sharp and professional, and glue ends together using a glue stick. Simpler alternative: use a box with attached lid and apply a decorative label or stamp.

    Step Three:


    Line box with sheet moss (2) and place miniature terracotta pot (6) and seed/soil packet inside. Print care and planting instructions on a sheet of vellum (3) and trim so it fits snugly within the box; replace lid.

    2
  • Give your wedding a beachy feel with a linen and white color scheme. Our inspiration was Queen Anne's Lace, which grows along the roadsides in late summer and offer a beautiful creamy color to a wedding. We gathered a bunch and plunked it into a cream colored handmade ceramic container, barely arranging it to give it a wild feel. We covered the table in linen and used white linen napkins tied with brown + white striped ribbon and a blossom to decorate the plates. We would recommend dark wood chairs or white, depending on your setting. This table is full of impact but a cinch to pull together! Your guests will enjoy this fresh take, on the traditional white wedding!

     

     

     

     

     

    0
  • I've had quite a few of my bride friends that have reached out to me asking about my DIY Accordion Program.  

     

     

     

     

    Taking inspiration from Martha Stewart, I started working on a mock-up of our accordion programs. I love the compact aspect of the programs and the fact that it's so different than what you normally see at weddings. :) Here's the Martha Stewart accordion program:

     

     

     

     

    For so long, I've admired the programs but often wondered about the manual labor involved with putting them together. Well, yesterday, I got my answer as I worked on our mock-up. Honestly, I was really surprised at how easy it was to put these together and-even more-I enjoyed the project.

     

     

    Our mock-ups are larger the the MS programs, mainly because I knew we will have older people at our weddings and I didn't want the words to be too small. Still, ours fit in the palm of your hand! :) Here's our mock-up:

     

     

    I have the ribbon glued (with double-sided tape) to the back of the program so the ribbon won't go flying everywhere when people open them.

     

     

     

     

     

     

    One of my favorite parts of the program. The simple back page, with a quote from "The Notebook". This is one project I am extremely proud of! I love how ours turned out and-as elements in the program are glued down-I will start putting batches together at a time.

     

     

     

     

     


    You'll need the following: Card stock paper for your cover (8.5" x 11" will be enough for 6 if you line it up right)

     

     


    Accordion template


    Rubber cement glue (or 2-sided tape, your choice)


    Scissors


    Paper-cutter (optional if you're good with cutting straight lines) Ribbon


    Here are the instructions I followed:


    Visit Jody Prose for her FREE templates (click on "accordion fold" program) Click HERE!

    Fill in template and print (most home printers can’t print tabloid pages, however, nearly all kinkos, mailboxes, etc and staples can) Make sure when packing the files on cd/memory stick, that you include a copy of all the fonts you have selected so that you can ensure that your file will print out exactly as you intended.

    Cut sheet in half so you have 2 programs.

    Fold sheet into quarters. To make your folds crisper, use a ruler and a non-serrated butter knife to crease the folds before you actually fold the pages.

    If you used all 8 cells for your program, you’ll need to attach the two pages together. Use rubber cement, a glue stick, or double sided tape to do so. You should have a long accordion at this point.

    Print the Accordion Program Cover and cut in half. Score and fold so that you have a 4.25”x5.5” cover. Using glue dots, rubber cement or a glue stick. Attach the one end of your accordion to the inside cover. Do the same for the outside cover. Repeat for the rest of your programs.
    ***********************************************

    Those are the actual instructions included on the template that you'll download. Here are my extra 2 cents:




    Print a few in black & white and a few in color. You can use the b&w copies for your first few tries & the colors for your final mock-up.
    I cannot stress enough, if you have downloaded fonts, how important it is to have those same fonts on the computer you're printing from. Kinko's didn't have my fonts so I had to think fast & find something suitable.
     
    You'll need a nice card stock paper for your cover. I decided to stay toned down for the cover because the damask was pretty busy inside.

    If you are going to include a ribbon like I did, you'll need to attach it to the back of the program with glue/tape, etc. It's the easiest way to ensure ribbons aren't left everywhere after people open them.

    Play with the size of your cover. I don't know the specific size of my cover, but I played with the size of it until I felt comfortable.

     

    If I don't count the time it took to print, the assembly of the program took {maybe} 5-7 minutes for each program. Not bad when Law & Order is on. This would be a GREAT DIY party project.

    CIAO


    Ebonee Monique

     

    1
  • By: Danyelle Mathews


    Do you have friends and family traveling great distances to attend your big day? If so, you might consider putting together little favor bags to welcome them when they arrive. You can include an itinerary for the festivities, some favorite treats and even personalized stationery to help them feel welcomed and appreciated.


    You will need: fabric drawstring bags, freezer paper, x-acto knife, pencil, paint, fabric medium, initial template, foam paintbrush, iron, small bowl   



     


    Step One

    Trace a monogram print-out to the freezer paper using a pencil. (Tip- here is great resource for unique fonts) 



     


    Step Two 

    Carefully cut out the monogram with the x-acto knife. 



     


    Step Three

    With your iron, adhere the monogram template to the drawstring bag. Once the template is adhered, mix two parts paint to one part fabric medium in a small bowl.



     


    Step Four 

    Carefully paint over the monogram template.




    Once the paint is dry, remove the template and fill your bag with your chosen treats. You can use this same idea to create favors or gift bags for your bridesmaids and groomsmen.

    4

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What could be more fun than telling your friends and family that you made everything at your wedding yourself? Well, an entire Do it Yourself wedding ...

might be going a bit overboard, but Project Wedding has tons of DIY wedding ideas for you to implement for your big day.

Whether you can’t cut a straight line or you’re the next Martha Stewart, we have DIY wedding ideas for every type of bride. From DIY wedding favors to DIY wedding decorations to DIY wedding invitations, if you’re interested in doing it yourself, we can help! With so many unique images of wedding ideas we’ve found, plus all our great photos of real weddings, you’ll find the most DIY wedding ideas here.

From simple wrap and tie wedding favors to more complex origami wedding decorations – if we think you can make it, you’ll find it here. These DIY favors are guaranteed to thrill your guests without emptying your pockets. Even if you’re not very crafty, we still have some fast and easy project ideas that you might like. And if you have creative friends or relatives, chances are they will be more than happy to help you.

DIY weddings are a great way to put a personal touch on all of your wedding details. You can add your initials to your wedding favors, make a candy buffet that complements your wedding colors, or create a masterpiece that looks store bought but cost way less. Whatever your reason for wanting a Do it Yourself wedding, our articles will help make your dreams come to life.

With so many great DIY wedding ideas, all of your family, friends and honored wedding guests are guaranteed to remember how amazingly creative your wedding day was. Now go get crafty!