SHOW FILTERS
339

DIY Wedding Ideas

  •  

    By: Chelsea Fuss     You will need: White paper bags Acrylic paint Paintbrush Number stencils (for table numbers) Painter's tape LED votive lights For the striped bags: Place strips of painters tape horizontally or vertically on flat bags, Measure to space them about an 1.5" a part. Paint in between the tape and then let it dry. Take the tape off when dry. Open bag and place LED lights inside.       For Numbered bags: Place stencil on flat bag and paint. Once dry, open bag and place light inside!     Line a stairway with the luminaries, mix and match them for a centerpiece or line your wedding aisle with them!     The hand-painted stripes look gorgeous when illuminated.     Total cost is $1.50 a piece including lights!     These hand-painted luminaries make a charming wedding decoration and a cheaper alternative to lanterns. Enjoy!   (photos by Chelsea Fuss)
    7
  • By: Chelsea Fuss

    This bouquet is so simple and effortless. Pair it with a lace dress or a simple sheath. The burlap adds a rustic touch that keeps it from being too sweet. The best part? This bouquet only costs around $15!     Materials: 10 double-petaled tulips 1-2 stems of "cheerful" narcissus Twine A piece of burlap A vase  Scissors   Directions:   1. Trim the very ends of the flowers.     2. Start with a few of the larger tulips at the bottom of the bouquet; add the smaller tulips towards the top.     3. Add the narcissus blossoms towards the bottom of the bouquet and off-center.     4. Wrap in twine, then wrap the burlap over that.       Your bouquet will be bright and fragrant.. enjoy the springtime blooms!   By: Chelsea Fuss
    9
  •  

    By ohhappyday.com   This is for those brides that have figured out a great favor to give, but need some packaging to make it pretty.     I prefer making the tassels out of crepe paper versus tissue paper because there is no glue needed and the crepe paper takes about five seconds to shape while the tissue paper takes a lot of time to "poof." These are really easy and really affordable to make. Here's how!   Materials: Folds of Crepe Paper Scissors Chinese Take Out Containers

    Step One Take a section of crepe paper that is folded in half (about 5" long when folded) and cut off very thin "sections."     Step Two Put two or three of the "sections" together (you'll want to test a few to get it the right thickness depending on the paper) and twist tightly starting in the middle.     Step Three When the middle section gets twisted enough let it naturally loop and begin twisting the crepe paper around itself (If you are attaching it to the wire handles you'll need to wrap it around before you twist.)     Tip no. 1 The stretchiness in the crepe paper will help it hold and stay tight.     Tip no. 2 The fewer sections the better it will hold. You should find the happy medium between making sure it holds tight and having a nice amount of thickness.     Step Four Very lightly "crunch" the tassle in your hand to give it a little body and trim it with scissors to even it out.      
    1
  • Photos by Jordan Ferney

      Supplies: 1. Metal Zinc Tray 14"x14"($10) 2. Wheat Grass Seeds($4)  3. Potting Soil ($8) 4. Gravel for Drainage     Step One: Put a layer of gravel to help with drainage. The metal tray we used did not have built in drainage so the gravel helps with that. Step Two: Put a layer of soil on top of the gravel, make sure you leave 1/2" of the metal vessel showing. Step Three: Put a generous layer of seeds down, make sure it is even up to the edges. Step Four: Cover the seeds with a .25" layer of soil. Pat down.     Step Five: Water the seeds with a gentle flow of water (either a watering can or a paper cup with holes punched in the bottom)so the seeds aren't washed around. Keep in a sunny area and water daily, keeping the soil moist. Grass should be ready 7-10 days after planting.     This gorgeous wheat grass is 14 days old.     The grass will eventually look overgrown so you'll want to test it in advance of the big day so you'll know what works best for you.     Wheat grass is an easy way to liven up a spring or summer event. You can use it for seating cards or even incorporate it into centerpieces.     For the seating cards, you will need the cards and popsicle sticks ( $2 from a craft store).     Wheat grass seeds can be bought at a health food store like Whole Foods. If after a week of growth you notice bare spots you can move the grass that is full around to cover it and give it a few days to grow in.     Voila! Your gorgeous DIY project is done!     This seating card display costs under $25.     Happy DIYing!

     

    4
  • Photos By: Cory O'Brien

    Erica O'Brien, of Erica O'Brien Cake Design, is frequently asked about the chevron technique, one of the hottest design trends this wedding season. Here, she shares her method.

    Materials: Water Tapemeasure Paper Cornstarch Fondant in the color(s) of your choice (We used a citrus-inspired palette here.) Xacto knife Scissors Food-use only paint brush A pen A rolling pin Fondant board

    Measure cake's circumference. Determine the size of the chevron by dividing circumference into even segments the size of your choosing, usually around 1" to 1.5". For example, our cake had a circumference of 26". We determined that each segment would be 1.3" for a total of 20.     Create chevron template. Measure segment size on paper and mark with pen.     Holding paper horizontally (landscape), fold into accordian so that each fold measures the same size as the segment.     Keep folding even segments....     Each of our folds measured 1.3"     Cut paper at an angle.     For a deeper chevron, angle scissors more vertically. For a more shallow chevron, angle scissors more horizontally.     Using the same angle as first cut, cut the other side of the paper. For a wider chevron, move scissor further from first cut. For a narrower chevron, move scissor closer to first cut. Unfold. Your chevron template is complete.     Roll fondant thinly.     Place template on fondant and carefully cut with Xacto knife. Avoid paper sticking to fondant by rubbing it with cornstarch.     Remove excess fondant.     Use template to gently score cake to guide placement of fondant chevron.     Use water to wet cake.     Apply fondant chevron to cake.     Continue pattern around entire cake.       Lay the second color directly above the first.   (Optionally, used the template to guide placement of another row evenly spaced above first row).     Repeat with additional colors.     For a finishing touch, add fresh flowers, or use sugar flowers like the ones seen here.     Photos By: Cory O'Brien
    5
  •  Photos By: Chelsea Fuss

    For your gorgeous spring wreath, you will need: 1 wreath form About 25 stems of boxwood or another spring green 5 steps of grape hyacinth (also called muscari) 5 stems of snowdrops 5 stems of lily of the valley water vials 1 yard of ribbon   Divide the boxwood by taking the stems off and grouping them into small bunches.     Secure the bunches on the wreath with string or wire onto the wreath form. Overlap each bunch so the stems don't show.     Look how gorgeous your wreath is already looking!     Voila - now you are ready to add florals...     Once the wreath is filled with greens, stick in the blooms (securing under the wire and string).     Final steps: Add a sweet bow on the bottom, right-hand corner. Add a hanger on the back by looping wire around the wreath form.     They will last for a few hours on their own, but for a wedding, we recommend buying water vials and stick the flowers in the vials before placing them in the wreath.     Enjoy this sweet wreath for your big day!  
    3
  • Photos By: Brittni Mehlhoff   A festive accent for a springtime bridal shower or Easter weekend wedding     Materials hollow decorative eggs or blown eggs, needle and thread or string, hydrangeas, scissors, awl     Step One Using an awl, carefully pierce all the way through the surface of your egg, about one inch from the top. This will make it much easier to get the string through.     Step Two Thread your string through a needle and guide the needle through the poked holes on the egg.     Step Three Continue steps one and two with additional eggs to create the desired length.     Step Four Once you have added all the eggs, you can begin adding the hydrangeas. Move the eggs 1-2 inches apart from one other on the garland string to make room for the flowers. Cut short trimming from a large hydrangea stem and attach to the garland after every egg or two with an extra piece of string.     Step Five Push the eggs back together between the hydrangeas if necessary. Repeat until entire garland is covered. Add a knot on each side of the finished strand and you are ready to hang.     Use these pretty, pastel strands as garlands that flank the aisles of your spring ceremony or as a hanging backdrop for guests to admire at the reception.    
    1
  • Project and Photos By: Jennifer Kirk   Color printing can make up the bulk of the cost for invitations. Below is a budget-friendly way to add interest and color to simple black and white invitations with bright fabrics and patterned paper.      You Will Need...   Materials: Fabric Patterned papers Spray mount   Tools: Sewing machine Rotary cutter Pinking shears Corner rounder     Step One For invitations that will go inside an A7 envelope (5.25"x7.25") cut out 5"x7" fabric rectangles. (You can use the downloadable PDF as a guide for both the fabric cutouts and invitations.)     Step Two  Fold fabric in half. Sew each side closed with a straight-stitched, 1/4" seam.     Step Three With pinking shears, trim the very edges of the sides and top. Your finished pouch holds a 4.35"x6.5" invitation.     Patterned Envelope Liners: Step One To line "announcement" envelopes (a straight envelope flap), first cut out paper rectangles measuring 6.75"x4".     Step Two Round the top corners with a paper corner rounder and lightly spray the back of the paper with spray mount.     Step Three With one hand, pop the envelop open. With your other hand, gently guide the paper partway into the envelope, rounded corners towards the top. The backside is sticky from the spray mount, so take care not to let it adhere to the envelope.     Step Four Align the top of the paper so that it sits just below the envelope adhesive and the edges are even on both sides of the flap. Press down firmly, then fold the flap down to crease the paper with the envelope.     Step Five Use scraps of paper to embellish RSVP cards, directions, etc.    
    5
  • By: Jenny Batt

    Fringe is still everywhere and I don’t think it's going out of style anytime soon. Traditionally, you take tiny pieces of fringe and cover shapes and large paper mache objects. For this DIY, I will show you a new technique to breeze through fringing anything.     Materials: Tissue Paper Cutting Mat and Rotary Cutter Scissors (or fringing scissors – easier) Elmer’s Glue Poster Board   Step One Lay several sheets of tissue paper flat and fold in half lengthwise. Use your cutting mat, a straight edge and your rotary cutter, to cut strips 2.5” wide across the fold.     Step Two Take each set of strips and unfold. Refold lengthwise.     Step Three Fold in half widthwise and cut fringe on the bottom (not the folded) edge.     Step Four Separate each fringed strip and refold lengthwise. Take your poster board and across the short edge, run a thin bead of glue across the length. Lay a fringed piece across the glue and press lightly to adhere. If the strip isn’t quite long enough to reach, just add pieces as needed. For the next layer add another bead of glue above the first strip and add another strip.     Step Five Repeat until the entire poster board is covered. Let dry.     Step Six Print out letters from your computer. Cut out the letters from the paper. Place each letter on the fringed board, adjusting it so the fringe goes left to right across the letter, and cut loosely around the edge. Once you have the smaller piece, use the template to cut out the shape perfectly.     Step Seven Repeat with remaining letters. Sometimes after cutting, the tops of the letters are missing fringe. Simply add touch up pieces of tissue paper fringe and glue down. Let dry and trim.     Step Eight Use a bunting template to make a fun garland. You can use the fringed poster board to make any shapes you like or keep as is for a fun backdrop or to use as a tray liner. The fringing goes quickly using this method and is less tedious than fringing each shape individually.     Step Nine To make a garland from the letters, simply flip over the pieces and tape down to twine. Here I used washi tape so I can remove and adjust the letters easily after hanging.     photos by hankandhunt.com      
    5
  • Photos By: Chelsea Fuss

    If you've always dreamt of carrying a bouquet of old fashioned garden roses down the aisle, but your budget doesn't quite match up to the dream, try this version!

    Materials: 24 stems of spray roses (It works best if you buy one bunch with buds and one bunch with open blossoms) Order them ahead of time to secure your favorite color! Garden clippers String or twine florist tape 1-2 yards of ribbon

    Directions: 

    First, pick off the brown petals from the blossoms. We used spray roses, one of the most inexpensive roses on the market, to create this bouquet.     "Edit" each stem. Spray roses have several blossoms on each stem. Clip 1-2 off each stem to leave the prettiest blossoms and the stems that are around the same level on the stem. Also, remove the leaves from these stems.     Take a few of the stems with nice leaves and clip off all the blossoms. Wash the leaves. Leave 1-2 branches of leaves on the stem. Make sure none of the leaves are too low on the stem or it will interfere with the "handle" of your bouquet. Be sure to choose leaves that are hydrated and feel firm.     Spray roses consist of 3-5 smaller blossoms on each stem, and have a more casual feel then your normal florists' roses. They are readily available at markets and florists all year.     Gather a few stems in one hand at a 45 degree angle. Each time you add a stem, turn your bouquet. Don't be afraid to place some blossoms higher than others. This gives your bouquet depth and interest.     Be sure to add leaves in as you go. These frame the blossoms and give the bouquet a natural feel. Tie with twine, cover in florist tape (to protect the ribbon) and tie up with a ribbon.     By deconstructing the spray roses, you can create a bouquet that looks very natural. Your guests will never guess that your flowers came from the local grocery!     The total cost of this bouquet: $12 + ribbon!     Enjoy your beautiful, garden bouquet!
    11
  •  

    By: Chelsea Fuss     You will need: White paper bags Acrylic paint Paintbrush Number stencils (for table numbers) Painter's tape LED votive lights For the striped bags: Place strips of painters tape horizontally or vertically on flat bags, Measure to space them about an 1.5" a part. Paint in between the tape and then let it dry. Take the tape off when dry. Open bag and place LED lights inside.       For Numbered bags: Place stencil on flat bag and paint. Once dry, open bag and place light inside!     Line a stairway with the luminaries, mix and match them for a centerpiece or line your wedding aisle with them!     The hand-painted stripes look gorgeous when illuminated.     Total cost is $1.50 a piece including lights!     These hand-painted luminaries make a charming wedding decoration and a cheaper alternative to lanterns. Enjoy!   (photos by Chelsea Fuss)
    7
  • By: Chelsea Fuss

    This bouquet is so simple and effortless. Pair it with a lace dress or a simple sheath. The burlap adds a rustic touch that keeps it from being too sweet. The best part? This bouquet only costs around $15!     Materials: 10 double-petaled tulips 1-2 stems of "cheerful" narcissus Twine A piece of burlap A vase  Scissors   Directions:   1. Trim the very ends of the flowers.     2. Start with a few of the larger tulips at the bottom of the bouquet; add the smaller tulips towards the top.     3. Add the narcissus blossoms towards the bottom of the bouquet and off-center.     4. Wrap in twine, then wrap the burlap over that.       Your bouquet will be bright and fragrant.. enjoy the springtime blooms!   By: Chelsea Fuss
    9
  •  

    By ohhappyday.com   This is for those brides that have figured out a great favor to give, but need some packaging to make it pretty.     I prefer making the tassels out of crepe paper versus tissue paper because there is no glue needed and the crepe paper takes about five seconds to shape while the tissue paper takes a lot of time to "poof." These are really easy and really affordable to make. Here's how!   Materials: Folds of Crepe Paper Scissors Chinese Take Out Containers

    Step One Take a section of crepe paper that is folded in half (about 5" long when folded) and cut off very thin "sections."     Step Two Put two or three of the "sections" together (you'll want to test a few to get it the right thickness depending on the paper) and twist tightly starting in the middle.     Step Three When the middle section gets twisted enough let it naturally loop and begin twisting the crepe paper around itself (If you are attaching it to the wire handles you'll need to wrap it around before you twist.)     Tip no. 1 The stretchiness in the crepe paper will help it hold and stay tight.     Tip no. 2 The fewer sections the better it will hold. You should find the happy medium between making sure it holds tight and having a nice amount of thickness.     Step Four Very lightly "crunch" the tassle in your hand to give it a little body and trim it with scissors to even it out.      
    1
  • Photos by Jordan Ferney

      Supplies: 1. Metal Zinc Tray 14"x14"($10) 2. Wheat Grass Seeds($4)  3. Potting Soil ($8) 4. Gravel for Drainage     Step One: Put a layer of gravel to help with drainage. The metal tray we used did not have built in drainage so the gravel helps with that. Step Two: Put a layer of soil on top of the gravel, make sure you leave 1/2" of the metal vessel showing. Step Three: Put a generous layer of seeds down, make sure it is even up to the edges. Step Four: Cover the seeds with a .25" layer of soil. Pat down.     Step Five: Water the seeds with a gentle flow of water (either a watering can or a paper cup with holes punched in the bottom)so the seeds aren't washed around. Keep in a sunny area and water daily, keeping the soil moist. Grass should be ready 7-10 days after planting.     This gorgeous wheat grass is 14 days old.     The grass will eventually look overgrown so you'll want to test it in advance of the big day so you'll know what works best for you.     Wheat grass is an easy way to liven up a spring or summer event. You can use it for seating cards or even incorporate it into centerpieces.     For the seating cards, you will need the cards and popsicle sticks ( $2 from a craft store).     Wheat grass seeds can be bought at a health food store like Whole Foods. If after a week of growth you notice bare spots you can move the grass that is full around to cover it and give it a few days to grow in.     Voila! Your gorgeous DIY project is done!     This seating card display costs under $25.     Happy DIYing!

     

    4
  • Photos By: Cory O'Brien

    Erica O'Brien, of Erica O'Brien Cake Design, is frequently asked about the chevron technique, one of the hottest design trends this wedding season. Here, she shares her method.

    Materials: Water Tapemeasure Paper Cornstarch Fondant in the color(s) of your choice (We used a citrus-inspired palette here.) Xacto knife Scissors Food-use only paint brush A pen A rolling pin Fondant board

    Measure cake's circumference. Determine the size of the chevron by dividing circumference into even segments the size of your choosing, usually around 1" to 1.5". For example, our cake had a circumference of 26". We determined that each segment would be 1.3" for a total of 20.     Create chevron template. Measure segment size on paper and mark with pen.     Holding paper horizontally (landscape), fold into accordian so that each fold measures the same size as the segment.     Keep folding even segments....     Each of our folds measured 1.3"     Cut paper at an angle.     For a deeper chevron, angle scissors more vertically. For a more shallow chevron, angle scissors more horizontally.     Using the same angle as first cut, cut the other side of the paper. For a wider chevron, move scissor further from first cut. For a narrower chevron, move scissor closer to first cut. Unfold. Your chevron template is complete.     Roll fondant thinly.     Place template on fondant and carefully cut with Xacto knife. Avoid paper sticking to fondant by rubbing it with cornstarch.     Remove excess fondant.     Use template to gently score cake to guide placement of fondant chevron.     Use water to wet cake.     Apply fondant chevron to cake.     Continue pattern around entire cake.       Lay the second color directly above the first.   (Optionally, used the template to guide placement of another row evenly spaced above first row).     Repeat with additional colors.     For a finishing touch, add fresh flowers, or use sugar flowers like the ones seen here.     Photos By: Cory O'Brien
    5
  •  Photos By: Chelsea Fuss

    For your gorgeous spring wreath, you will need: 1 wreath form About 25 stems of boxwood or another spring green 5 steps of grape hyacinth (also called muscari) 5 stems of snowdrops 5 stems of lily of the valley water vials 1 yard of ribbon   Divide the boxwood by taking the stems off and grouping them into small bunches.     Secure the bunches on the wreath with string or wire onto the wreath form. Overlap each bunch so the stems don't show.     Look how gorgeous your wreath is already looking!     Voila - now you are ready to add florals...     Once the wreath is filled with greens, stick in the blooms (securing under the wire and string).     Final steps: Add a sweet bow on the bottom, right-hand corner. Add a hanger on the back by looping wire around the wreath form.     They will last for a few hours on their own, but for a wedding, we recommend buying water vials and stick the flowers in the vials before placing them in the wreath.     Enjoy this sweet wreath for your big day!  
    3
  • Photos By: Brittni Mehlhoff   A festive accent for a springtime bridal shower or Easter weekend wedding     Materials hollow decorative eggs or blown eggs, needle and thread or string, hydrangeas, scissors, awl     Step One Using an awl, carefully pierce all the way through the surface of your egg, about one inch from the top. This will make it much easier to get the string through.     Step Two Thread your string through a needle and guide the needle through the poked holes on the egg.     Step Three Continue steps one and two with additional eggs to create the desired length.     Step Four Once you have added all the eggs, you can begin adding the hydrangeas. Move the eggs 1-2 inches apart from one other on the garland string to make room for the flowers. Cut short trimming from a large hydrangea stem and attach to the garland after every egg or two with an extra piece of string.     Step Five Push the eggs back together between the hydrangeas if necessary. Repeat until entire garland is covered. Add a knot on each side of the finished strand and you are ready to hang.     Use these pretty, pastel strands as garlands that flank the aisles of your spring ceremony or as a hanging backdrop for guests to admire at the reception.    
    1
  • Project and Photos By: Jennifer Kirk   Color printing can make up the bulk of the cost for invitations. Below is a budget-friendly way to add interest and color to simple black and white invitations with bright fabrics and patterned paper.      You Will Need...   Materials: Fabric Patterned papers Spray mount   Tools: Sewing machine Rotary cutter Pinking shears Corner rounder     Step One For invitations that will go inside an A7 envelope (5.25"x7.25") cut out 5"x7" fabric rectangles. (You can use the downloadable PDF as a guide for both the fabric cutouts and invitations.)     Step Two  Fold fabric in half. Sew each side closed with a straight-stitched, 1/4" seam.     Step Three With pinking shears, trim the very edges of the sides and top. Your finished pouch holds a 4.35"x6.5" invitation.     Patterned Envelope Liners: Step One To line "announcement" envelopes (a straight envelope flap), first cut out paper rectangles measuring 6.75"x4".     Step Two Round the top corners with a paper corner rounder and lightly spray the back of the paper with spray mount.     Step Three With one hand, pop the envelop open. With your other hand, gently guide the paper partway into the envelope, rounded corners towards the top. The backside is sticky from the spray mount, so take care not to let it adhere to the envelope.     Step Four Align the top of the paper so that it sits just below the envelope adhesive and the edges are even on both sides of the flap. Press down firmly, then fold the flap down to crease the paper with the envelope.     Step Five Use scraps of paper to embellish RSVP cards, directions, etc.    
    5
  • By: Jenny Batt

    Fringe is still everywhere and I don’t think it's going out of style anytime soon. Traditionally, you take tiny pieces of fringe and cover shapes and large paper mache objects. For this DIY, I will show you a new technique to breeze through fringing anything.     Materials: Tissue Paper Cutting Mat and Rotary Cutter Scissors (or fringing scissors – easier) Elmer’s Glue Poster Board   Step One Lay several sheets of tissue paper flat and fold in half lengthwise. Use your cutting mat, a straight edge and your rotary cutter, to cut strips 2.5” wide across the fold.     Step Two Take each set of strips and unfold. Refold lengthwise.     Step Three Fold in half widthwise and cut fringe on the bottom (not the folded) edge.     Step Four Separate each fringed strip and refold lengthwise. Take your poster board and across the short edge, run a thin bead of glue across the length. Lay a fringed piece across the glue and press lightly to adhere. If the strip isn’t quite long enough to reach, just add pieces as needed. For the next layer add another bead of glue above the first strip and add another strip.     Step Five Repeat until the entire poster board is covered. Let dry.     Step Six Print out letters from your computer. Cut out the letters from the paper. Place each letter on the fringed board, adjusting it so the fringe goes left to right across the letter, and cut loosely around the edge. Once you have the smaller piece, use the template to cut out the shape perfectly.     Step Seven Repeat with remaining letters. Sometimes after cutting, the tops of the letters are missing fringe. Simply add touch up pieces of tissue paper fringe and glue down. Let dry and trim.     Step Eight Use a bunting template to make a fun garland. You can use the fringed poster board to make any shapes you like or keep as is for a fun backdrop or to use as a tray liner. The fringing goes quickly using this method and is less tedious than fringing each shape individually.     Step Nine To make a garland from the letters, simply flip over the pieces and tape down to twine. Here I used washi tape so I can remove and adjust the letters easily after hanging.     photos by hankandhunt.com      
    5
  • Photos By: Chelsea Fuss

    If you've always dreamt of carrying a bouquet of old fashioned garden roses down the aisle, but your budget doesn't quite match up to the dream, try this version!

    Materials: 24 stems of spray roses (It works best if you buy one bunch with buds and one bunch with open blossoms) Order them ahead of time to secure your favorite color! Garden clippers String or twine florist tape 1-2 yards of ribbon

    Directions: 

    First, pick off the brown petals from the blossoms. We used spray roses, one of the most inexpensive roses on the market, to create this bouquet.     "Edit" each stem. Spray roses have several blossoms on each stem. Clip 1-2 off each stem to leave the prettiest blossoms and the stems that are around the same level on the stem. Also, remove the leaves from these stems.     Take a few of the stems with nice leaves and clip off all the blossoms. Wash the leaves. Leave 1-2 branches of leaves on the stem. Make sure none of the leaves are too low on the stem or it will interfere with the "handle" of your bouquet. Be sure to choose leaves that are hydrated and feel firm.     Spray roses consist of 3-5 smaller blossoms on each stem, and have a more casual feel then your normal florists' roses. They are readily available at markets and florists all year.     Gather a few stems in one hand at a 45 degree angle. Each time you add a stem, turn your bouquet. Don't be afraid to place some blossoms higher than others. This gives your bouquet depth and interest.     Be sure to add leaves in as you go. These frame the blossoms and give the bouquet a natural feel. Tie with twine, cover in florist tape (to protect the ribbon) and tie up with a ribbon.     By deconstructing the spray roses, you can create a bouquet that looks very natural. Your guests will never guess that your flowers came from the local grocery!     The total cost of this bouquet: $12 + ribbon!     Enjoy your beautiful, garden bouquet!
    11

Get Started!

Create inspiration boards, share ideas with your friends and wedding vendors, get feedback from brides like you, and lots more!

Have a question? Contact Support

Find Your Wedding Vendors

Featured Vendors Near You

Related Photos
Related Forums
What could be more fun than telling your friends and family that you made everything at your wedding yourself? Well, an entire Do it Yourself wedding ...

might be going a bit overboard, but Project Wedding has tons of DIY wedding ideas for you to implement for your big day.

Whether you can’t cut a straight line or you’re the next Martha Stewart, we have DIY wedding ideas for every type of bride. From DIY wedding favors to DIY wedding decorations to DIY wedding invitations, if you’re interested in doing it yourself, we can help! With so many unique images of wedding ideas we’ve found, plus all our great photos of real weddings, you’ll find the most DIY wedding ideas here.

From simple wrap and tie wedding favors to more complex origami wedding decorations – if we think you can make it, you’ll find it here. These DIY favors are guaranteed to thrill your guests without emptying your pockets. Even if you’re not very crafty, we still have some fast and easy project ideas that you might like. And if you have creative friends or relatives, chances are they will be more than happy to help you.

DIY weddings are a great way to put a personal touch on all of your wedding details. You can add your initials to your wedding favors, make a candy buffet that complements your wedding colors, or create a masterpiece that looks store bought but cost way less. Whatever your reason for wanting a Do it Yourself wedding, our articles will help make your dreams come to life.

With so many great DIY wedding ideas, all of your family, friends and honored wedding guests are guaranteed to remember how amazingly creative your wedding day was. Now go get crafty!