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338

DIY Wedding Ideas

  • Project and Photos by: Jenny Batt of hankandhunt.com

    Pretty tissue tassels aren't just for garland or balloons anymore. Why not add them to simple honeycomb balls and hang in groups for maximum impact. These tassels are cheaper versions and you can make a bunch in no time at all.     Materials: Honeycomb balls (I get mine at www.devra-party.com) Tissue paper Twine or fishing line Scissors Tape

    1. Unfold your sheets of tissue paper and cut into quarters, once in half lengthwise and once in half widthwise. Fold each quarter in half lengthwise again and cut.     2. Starting at the bottom, cut 3/4" fringe all the way up the sheet, leaving 1 inch before the other end.     3. Take a few sheets and trim the fringe shorter by about 3". Take a few more sheets and trim shorter by about 6". This isn't exact, experiment with lengths you like.     4. Layer 3 long sheets, 2 to 3 mid-length sheets and 2 short sheets, on top of each other longest to shortest. Offset the top of the sheets to offset the fringe lines. Staple all the sheets together on top to hold.     5. Roll the sheets together and tape the top tight.     6. Tape the top to the center of the honeycomb ball, making sure the tape reaches both sides of the ball, as shown.     7. Open your ball and hang.     Add different sizes of honeycomb balls. To attach a smaller honeycomb ball to a larger one, like these, simply add the smaller one's twine hang tag to the inside center of the larger ball with tape.      Make a few or a bunch, these are sure to liven up any reception or dessert table. I love to hang decorations everywhere. This plain marble table was just begging to have a pop of color below.     Use empty areas around your venue and fill them with cheerful decorations. A little bit unexpected, a whole lot of merriment.

    Project and Photos by: Jenny Batt of hankandhunt.com

    12
  •  

    Photos By: ohhappyday.com   We're a big fan of edible favors and these chocolate letters are no exception.     Letter Perfect: The fact that these double as a name cards and will make just about any type nerd or design geek melt, is just an added bonus.   A Special Touch: These letters are made of delicious chocolate. Choose one for each of your guests' names for an extra special personalized touch! These make a fun and graphic addition to any wedding.     1. The chocolate letters can be hand made with candy molds. We didn't try that here, but if you had time on your hands or had a candy maker in the family it would be a cinch. Alphabet molds are very common.   Tip: Otherwise you can order the letters premade right here. We recommend the 4" letters.     2. For packaging, the sky is the limit. Here we bought cellophane bags a few inches larger than the letters.     3. Then we purchased some patterned scrapbook paper to use as a backing. Finally we added a flag label with the name of the guest for a little festive touch.        Photos By: ohhappyday.com
    20
  • Photos By: Chelsea Fuss

      Handwritten paper goods can add a charming touch to your wedding decor. Plus, they are inexpensive!     Grab some card stock, a paper cutter, a white pen, and some friends to help!     Cute stamps also add unique touches to your paper place cards and table numbers.     Use a paper cutter or x-acto knife and straight edge, to make sure the edges are nice and straight. Have a rag handy, sometimes the white ink can be a bit messy.     For the menu, we used white ink, a stamp and a white pen.      For the table numbers, we used a fold over card, a hardware store stencil and a white pen.     A Tip: Practice the handwriting you want to use on a separate piece of paper before decorating all the paper.     Simple floral arrangements and fruit make this setup adorable.     There's something so personal and sweet about handwritten cards.     Voila! Your table setup is complete - and gorgeous!    
    4
  • Project and Photos By: Chelsea Fuss

    It's your wedding day, so carry the bouquet you love. This recipe is for a pretty, fragrant garden rose bouquet, that you can make yourself! We've shared some insiders florists's tips to help you along the way. The total cost was around $50!     Flower Recipe: 6 garden roses (ask your florist for David Austin or old garden roses and they can help you) 1 bunch of spray roses 2 stems of rice flower 1 stem of fern clippers scissors twill ribbon twine   Step One: Start by trimming up all of the flowers. Remove most of the leaves and extra branches from the stems. Remember, you can save these and make small flower girl bouquets from them like florists do. Save any stems that are more than 2 inches to do so.     Step Two: De-thorn your roses by taking a towel and running it down the stem of the roses with a little bit of strength. This is a florist's trick!     Step Three: Cut all of the stems at an angle and let them soak in lukewarm water. If you have any roses that are closed, you can put them in a warm place so that they open up, but do keep them away from direct sunlight. Garden roses open up fairly quickly so you'll actually want them just open midway when you start to arrange the bouquet. Once you start working with them, the roses will continue opening because they'll be warm from your hands.     Step Four: Start with a few of the larger garden roses, grouped loosely together. Hold the bouquet in the same hand while making it and add flowers in with your other hand. Turn the bouquet each time you add flowers.     Step Five: Next, add spray roses to fill in between the garden roses. Be sure to keep the garden roses mostly grouped together, eventually you'll fill the other side with spray roses, rice flower and fern.     Step Six: Add in the rice flower between the clusters of spray roses.     Step Seven: Add the fern to that same side of the bouquet to balance the large garden roses.     Step Eight: Secure the bouquet with twine, trim the stems, and cover the twine with twill ribbon.     Store the bouquet in water, in a cool place until ready for use.    
    9
  • Photo By: Michael Bautista for Kathy Chong

    If you're planning to DIY your candy or dessert table, but you also want it to be aesthetic eye candy, consider a monochromatic display that complements your color palette.     In honor of the lush warm weather, we went with colors that reminded us of sunny spring days – whites, peaches, yellows, and pinks. We wanted to keep the table bright, yet still soft and delicate, so we made sure to maintain that theme in all our choices.     With your visual goals in mind, picking the candy is the fun part! Consider sweets of different shapes and sizes, to vary the display. These sumptuous sweets were made by Fiona's Sweet Shoppe.     Collect cake stands, dishes, and other items- not only to hold the goods- but also to give the table layers, height, and dimension.     Typical candy tables attempt to recreate a chocolatier's counter or the endless rows of jars in a candy shop. These inspirations can help produce some stunning displays.     It takes a lot of candy to fill up an entire table but if you think ahead, you can also avoid waste. Although vast amounts of white gumballs may look impressive, consider how much will actually be eaten. Plan to buy amounts that your guests will actually eat or be happy to take home.     Think outside of the candy box! Thin cookie sticks dipped in white chocolate added a vertical component to our display.     Add a few non-edible embellishments to give the table extra pizazz. Florals by Nancy Liu Chin Designs.     Embrace experimentation and test out various display layouts to play with height and depth. Juxtapose stacked cake stands, medium jars, and trays on top of a flat tablecloth to create very simple and clean lines, as shown here. Or, add height by placing boxes underneath the tablecloth.     Cute little paper goodie bags can be fun for guests to fill up and save for later, while small plates provided by your reception venue may be a more eco-friendly option.     Candy tables can truly be a visual and edible delight, just keep it simple and have fun with it!     Photo By: Michael Bautista for Kathy Chong
    4
  • Project and Photos by Brittni Mehlhoff     Create these easy cones, using decorative paper, to add a special touch to the confetti toss or the treats table. Use them in lieu of standard bags to fold anything from candy and popcorn to confetti and flowers.     Materials: Decorative Paper Heavy Cardstock Scissors Pencil or Pen Glue Stick or Double Sided Tape Straightedge How-To:       1. Start by creating a tall triangle with a pencil and straightedge, on cardstock. The dimensions of the triangle shown are as follows: 4.5 x 4.5 x 3.5. Then cut it out.        2. Using the triangle you just cut out, create a template on cardstock, by tracing the triangle and then tracing another triangle right next to that one, so that they are touching. Then create a 1/4 inch strip on the long side of the second triangle. Angling the edges inward. See photo.       3. Cut out the template created in Step 2 and trace onto the backside of a decorative sheet of paper. Then cut out.     4. Next, fold the far triangle on top of the second, connected triangle. Then fold the extra flap/ strip over that, to create a crease. Then, unfold so that the triangles are flat again.       5. Fold the flap back and apply glue to the entire flap. Then fold the far triangle on top again and press down until glue is secure.     6. Fill with confetti, flower petals, or candy and enjoy.     Ta-da!
    0
  • Project and Photos by Erica O'Brien

    Create these sweet-as-sugar table numbers in a few easy steps!

    What You’ll Need: 

    Ruler Fondant in color of your choice pizza wheel 5 x 7 paper embossing folder (Erica OBrien used an Anna Griffin by Cuttlebug  design) Number cutters Cornstarch (to prevent sticking) Sugar cookie recipe of your choice Fondant smoother Exacto knife Food-use only paintbrush Small rolling pin Water

    How To:

    Roll out sugar cookie dough to about 1/4" thick. Use ruler and pizza wheel to cut into 4” x 6” rectangle. Repeat as many times as needed. 

    Lay cut rectangles on baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Refrigerate 15 minutes or until firm.

    Using number cutters, carefully cut out table numbers as needed. Refrigerate again until firm, about 15 minutes.

    Bake until lightly browned. Allow to cool.

    Roll fondant thin, about 1/8” thick, into about a 5” x 7” rectangle. Be sure to roll to an even thickness.

    Place embossed side of paper embossing folder on rolled fondant, pressing firmly.

    Use fondant smoother with firm pressure to evenly emboss fondant. Check that fondant evenly fills cavities on paper embossing folder.

    Gently lift embossing folder off fondant.

    Impression should be even all over fondant.

    Using water and food-use only brush, wet entire surface of number cookie.

    Adhere fondant to cookie (embossed side facing up) and flip cookie so that back of cookie is facing up.

    Place pizza wheel against edge of cookie and cut fondant to same size as cookie.

    Use exactly knife to cut number out of fondant.

    Gently remove fondant cut out.

    There you have it!

    0
  • By Mary Swenson

    Warm-weather weddings, whether they're indoor or outside, call for plenty of liquids for your guests. These subtly-flavored waters are easy to make, are a creative way to hydrate your guests, and can do double-duty as table numbers!     Purchase glass bottles with airtight stoppers (like these) for your water; they look great, and the stoppers will keep your water as fresh as possible.     We used a simple number stencil and multi-surface acrylic paint to put the table number on each bottle. No stencils? Painting the number by hand can be just as charming.     Once the numbers are fully dry, you are ready to start flavoring the water. Start by adding the flavorings of your choice to each bottle, fill them to the top with water, and secure the stoppers. Done!     We combined cucumber and mint in our bottle, but the flavor possibilities are endless. Try raspberry and lime; sliced lemon, peaches, watermelon, or strawberries; vanilla beans...whatever you like! Make sure any fruit you use is washed thoroughly before using, and use spring or filtered water for the best taste.     Chill your water before placing them on each table. As guests arrive to their tables, they can help themselves to sips of the refreshing brew. Ahhh!     By Mary Swenson  
    8
  • Photos By: Mary Swenson

    These jars of herbed salt are so easy to make and will rival anything you'll find in a pricey gourmet food shop - plus the adorable jars can be used long after the tasty salt is gone!     Small glass canning jars - like these 4.5 ounce jars made by Weck - are the perfect size and shape for these favors, and are easy to buy in bulk just about anywhere.   If you can't find Weck jars, any small glass jar will do; just make sure that it has a lid that will create an air-tight seal.     The ingredients are simple: just use your favorite combination of fresh herbs (we chose garlic, rosemary, and sage).     Of course you'll need coarse kosher salt.     1. Strip the herbs from their stems, and discard the stems.     2. Peel and coarsely chop the garlic cloves. Add the herbs and garlic to a food processor and pulse until they are finely chopped. Add the salt and pulse a few times until the mixture is fully combined.     3. Put the contents into a bowl and let it sit uncovered for a few days in a cool, dry spot. Give the salt a good mix every day or so to break apart any chunks that appear.     4. When the salt is ready, fill the jars with the salt and cover with the lids. A 3-pound box of salt will fill about a dozen 4.5 ounce jars, so adjust the recipe for the number of favors you'll need.     5. The finishing touch? Labels! For ours, we cut pieces of paper so that they covered the top of the lid and came down along the side of the jar. Personalize your label as you wish and simply glue them onto the jars.     This super tasty salt can be used as a rub, as a finishing salt, or in place of any seasoning. As long as the lid is kept on tight, it can be stored indefinitely and will be a tasty reminder of your wedding day!     Photos By: Mary Swenson
    10
  • Project By: Victoria Hudgins

    Photos By: Prokopets Studios

    Warm Fall Décor: The further we step into fall, the more we are lead towards cozy fabrics and décor that evokes warmth. Engraving wood is a perfect way to bring the feeling of fall to life in your wedding, and it's easier than you'd think!     Floral Centers & Escort Cards: Here we'll show you how to make engraved centerpieces and matching wooden escort cards.     Materials: A simple wood engraver (available for under $20 at Michaels). Wood to engrave, buy or make your own wooden boxes to hold florals Wooden seating cards (a stack of 25 is in the dollar section at JoAnn's this season... hooray!) Small floral foam to place inside your centerpiece boxes. Directions: 1. Start with a pencil and outline the number or design you would like to make. Erase any misprints until you have a good line to follow. Then, heat up your engraver until you start to see smoke!     2. Begin tracing your pencil line, or freehand engrave if you are brave. Your will need to press down quite hard to get a deep continuous line. If your line is dotty, simply go over the tracing a second time, pressing more firmly. You should get the hang of it pretty quickly.     3. Once your engraving is done, wet down the floral foam and place flowers of your choice inside each box.     Escort Card Concept: We love the idea of placing the seating cards on a chalkboard surface. Engrave a table number on each wooden tag and write in your guest's name alongside it.     Warning: this new found skill is addicting, you will soon be engraving every piece of wood you can find!     Project By: Victoria Hudgins Photos By: Prokopets Studios

     

    3
  • Project and Photos by: Jenny Batt of hankandhunt.com

    Pretty tissue tassels aren't just for garland or balloons anymore. Why not add them to simple honeycomb balls and hang in groups for maximum impact. These tassels are cheaper versions and you can make a bunch in no time at all.     Materials: Honeycomb balls (I get mine at www.devra-party.com) Tissue paper Twine or fishing line Scissors Tape

    1. Unfold your sheets of tissue paper and cut into quarters, once in half lengthwise and once in half widthwise. Fold each quarter in half lengthwise again and cut.     2. Starting at the bottom, cut 3/4" fringe all the way up the sheet, leaving 1 inch before the other end.     3. Take a few sheets and trim the fringe shorter by about 3". Take a few more sheets and trim shorter by about 6". This isn't exact, experiment with lengths you like.     4. Layer 3 long sheets, 2 to 3 mid-length sheets and 2 short sheets, on top of each other longest to shortest. Offset the top of the sheets to offset the fringe lines. Staple all the sheets together on top to hold.     5. Roll the sheets together and tape the top tight.     6. Tape the top to the center of the honeycomb ball, making sure the tape reaches both sides of the ball, as shown.     7. Open your ball and hang.     Add different sizes of honeycomb balls. To attach a smaller honeycomb ball to a larger one, like these, simply add the smaller one's twine hang tag to the inside center of the larger ball with tape.      Make a few or a bunch, these are sure to liven up any reception or dessert table. I love to hang decorations everywhere. This plain marble table was just begging to have a pop of color below.     Use empty areas around your venue and fill them with cheerful decorations. A little bit unexpected, a whole lot of merriment.

    Project and Photos by: Jenny Batt of hankandhunt.com

    12
  •  

    Photos By: ohhappyday.com   We're a big fan of edible favors and these chocolate letters are no exception.     Letter Perfect: The fact that these double as a name cards and will make just about any type nerd or design geek melt, is just an added bonus.   A Special Touch: These letters are made of delicious chocolate. Choose one for each of your guests' names for an extra special personalized touch! These make a fun and graphic addition to any wedding.     1. The chocolate letters can be hand made with candy molds. We didn't try that here, but if you had time on your hands or had a candy maker in the family it would be a cinch. Alphabet molds are very common.   Tip: Otherwise you can order the letters premade right here. We recommend the 4" letters.     2. For packaging, the sky is the limit. Here we bought cellophane bags a few inches larger than the letters.     3. Then we purchased some patterned scrapbook paper to use as a backing. Finally we added a flag label with the name of the guest for a little festive touch.        Photos By: ohhappyday.com
    20
  • Photos By: Chelsea Fuss

      Handwritten paper goods can add a charming touch to your wedding decor. Plus, they are inexpensive!     Grab some card stock, a paper cutter, a white pen, and some friends to help!     Cute stamps also add unique touches to your paper place cards and table numbers.     Use a paper cutter or x-acto knife and straight edge, to make sure the edges are nice and straight. Have a rag handy, sometimes the white ink can be a bit messy.     For the menu, we used white ink, a stamp and a white pen.      For the table numbers, we used a fold over card, a hardware store stencil and a white pen.     A Tip: Practice the handwriting you want to use on a separate piece of paper before decorating all the paper.     Simple floral arrangements and fruit make this setup adorable.     There's something so personal and sweet about handwritten cards.     Voila! Your table setup is complete - and gorgeous!    
    4
  • Project and Photos By: Chelsea Fuss

    It's your wedding day, so carry the bouquet you love. This recipe is for a pretty, fragrant garden rose bouquet, that you can make yourself! We've shared some insiders florists's tips to help you along the way. The total cost was around $50!     Flower Recipe: 6 garden roses (ask your florist for David Austin or old garden roses and they can help you) 1 bunch of spray roses 2 stems of rice flower 1 stem of fern clippers scissors twill ribbon twine   Step One: Start by trimming up all of the flowers. Remove most of the leaves and extra branches from the stems. Remember, you can save these and make small flower girl bouquets from them like florists do. Save any stems that are more than 2 inches to do so.     Step Two: De-thorn your roses by taking a towel and running it down the stem of the roses with a little bit of strength. This is a florist's trick!     Step Three: Cut all of the stems at an angle and let them soak in lukewarm water. If you have any roses that are closed, you can put them in a warm place so that they open up, but do keep them away from direct sunlight. Garden roses open up fairly quickly so you'll actually want them just open midway when you start to arrange the bouquet. Once you start working with them, the roses will continue opening because they'll be warm from your hands.     Step Four: Start with a few of the larger garden roses, grouped loosely together. Hold the bouquet in the same hand while making it and add flowers in with your other hand. Turn the bouquet each time you add flowers.     Step Five: Next, add spray roses to fill in between the garden roses. Be sure to keep the garden roses mostly grouped together, eventually you'll fill the other side with spray roses, rice flower and fern.     Step Six: Add in the rice flower between the clusters of spray roses.     Step Seven: Add the fern to that same side of the bouquet to balance the large garden roses.     Step Eight: Secure the bouquet with twine, trim the stems, and cover the twine with twill ribbon.     Store the bouquet in water, in a cool place until ready for use.    
    9
  • Photo By: Michael Bautista for Kathy Chong

    If you're planning to DIY your candy or dessert table, but you also want it to be aesthetic eye candy, consider a monochromatic display that complements your color palette.     In honor of the lush warm weather, we went with colors that reminded us of sunny spring days – whites, peaches, yellows, and pinks. We wanted to keep the table bright, yet still soft and delicate, so we made sure to maintain that theme in all our choices.     With your visual goals in mind, picking the candy is the fun part! Consider sweets of different shapes and sizes, to vary the display. These sumptuous sweets were made by Fiona's Sweet Shoppe.     Collect cake stands, dishes, and other items- not only to hold the goods- but also to give the table layers, height, and dimension.     Typical candy tables attempt to recreate a chocolatier's counter or the endless rows of jars in a candy shop. These inspirations can help produce some stunning displays.     It takes a lot of candy to fill up an entire table but if you think ahead, you can also avoid waste. Although vast amounts of white gumballs may look impressive, consider how much will actually be eaten. Plan to buy amounts that your guests will actually eat or be happy to take home.     Think outside of the candy box! Thin cookie sticks dipped in white chocolate added a vertical component to our display.     Add a few non-edible embellishments to give the table extra pizazz. Florals by Nancy Liu Chin Designs.     Embrace experimentation and test out various display layouts to play with height and depth. Juxtapose stacked cake stands, medium jars, and trays on top of a flat tablecloth to create very simple and clean lines, as shown here. Or, add height by placing boxes underneath the tablecloth.     Cute little paper goodie bags can be fun for guests to fill up and save for later, while small plates provided by your reception venue may be a more eco-friendly option.     Candy tables can truly be a visual and edible delight, just keep it simple and have fun with it!     Photo By: Michael Bautista for Kathy Chong
    4
  • Project and Photos by Brittni Mehlhoff     Create these easy cones, using decorative paper, to add a special touch to the confetti toss or the treats table. Use them in lieu of standard bags to fold anything from candy and popcorn to confetti and flowers.     Materials: Decorative Paper Heavy Cardstock Scissors Pencil or Pen Glue Stick or Double Sided Tape Straightedge How-To:       1. Start by creating a tall triangle with a pencil and straightedge, on cardstock. The dimensions of the triangle shown are as follows: 4.5 x 4.5 x 3.5. Then cut it out.        2. Using the triangle you just cut out, create a template on cardstock, by tracing the triangle and then tracing another triangle right next to that one, so that they are touching. Then create a 1/4 inch strip on the long side of the second triangle. Angling the edges inward. See photo.       3. Cut out the template created in Step 2 and trace onto the backside of a decorative sheet of paper. Then cut out.     4. Next, fold the far triangle on top of the second, connected triangle. Then fold the extra flap/ strip over that, to create a crease. Then, unfold so that the triangles are flat again.       5. Fold the flap back and apply glue to the entire flap. Then fold the far triangle on top again and press down until glue is secure.     6. Fill with confetti, flower petals, or candy and enjoy.     Ta-da!
    0
  • Project and Photos by Erica O'Brien

    Create these sweet-as-sugar table numbers in a few easy steps!

    What You’ll Need: 

    Ruler Fondant in color of your choice pizza wheel 5 x 7 paper embossing folder (Erica OBrien used an Anna Griffin by Cuttlebug  design) Number cutters Cornstarch (to prevent sticking) Sugar cookie recipe of your choice Fondant smoother Exacto knife Food-use only paintbrush Small rolling pin Water

    How To:

    Roll out sugar cookie dough to about 1/4" thick. Use ruler and pizza wheel to cut into 4” x 6” rectangle. Repeat as many times as needed. 

    Lay cut rectangles on baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Refrigerate 15 minutes or until firm.

    Using number cutters, carefully cut out table numbers as needed. Refrigerate again until firm, about 15 minutes.

    Bake until lightly browned. Allow to cool.

    Roll fondant thin, about 1/8” thick, into about a 5” x 7” rectangle. Be sure to roll to an even thickness.

    Place embossed side of paper embossing folder on rolled fondant, pressing firmly.

    Use fondant smoother with firm pressure to evenly emboss fondant. Check that fondant evenly fills cavities on paper embossing folder.

    Gently lift embossing folder off fondant.

    Impression should be even all over fondant.

    Using water and food-use only brush, wet entire surface of number cookie.

    Adhere fondant to cookie (embossed side facing up) and flip cookie so that back of cookie is facing up.

    Place pizza wheel against edge of cookie and cut fondant to same size as cookie.

    Use exactly knife to cut number out of fondant.

    Gently remove fondant cut out.

    There you have it!

    0
  • By Mary Swenson

    Warm-weather weddings, whether they're indoor or outside, call for plenty of liquids for your guests. These subtly-flavored waters are easy to make, are a creative way to hydrate your guests, and can do double-duty as table numbers!     Purchase glass bottles with airtight stoppers (like these) for your water; they look great, and the stoppers will keep your water as fresh as possible.     We used a simple number stencil and multi-surface acrylic paint to put the table number on each bottle. No stencils? Painting the number by hand can be just as charming.     Once the numbers are fully dry, you are ready to start flavoring the water. Start by adding the flavorings of your choice to each bottle, fill them to the top with water, and secure the stoppers. Done!     We combined cucumber and mint in our bottle, but the flavor possibilities are endless. Try raspberry and lime; sliced lemon, peaches, watermelon, or strawberries; vanilla beans...whatever you like! Make sure any fruit you use is washed thoroughly before using, and use spring or filtered water for the best taste.     Chill your water before placing them on each table. As guests arrive to their tables, they can help themselves to sips of the refreshing brew. Ahhh!     By Mary Swenson  
    8
  • Photos By: Mary Swenson

    These jars of herbed salt are so easy to make and will rival anything you'll find in a pricey gourmet food shop - plus the adorable jars can be used long after the tasty salt is gone!     Small glass canning jars - like these 4.5 ounce jars made by Weck - are the perfect size and shape for these favors, and are easy to buy in bulk just about anywhere.   If you can't find Weck jars, any small glass jar will do; just make sure that it has a lid that will create an air-tight seal.     The ingredients are simple: just use your favorite combination of fresh herbs (we chose garlic, rosemary, and sage).     Of course you'll need coarse kosher salt.     1. Strip the herbs from their stems, and discard the stems.     2. Peel and coarsely chop the garlic cloves. Add the herbs and garlic to a food processor and pulse until they are finely chopped. Add the salt and pulse a few times until the mixture is fully combined.     3. Put the contents into a bowl and let it sit uncovered for a few days in a cool, dry spot. Give the salt a good mix every day or so to break apart any chunks that appear.     4. When the salt is ready, fill the jars with the salt and cover with the lids. A 3-pound box of salt will fill about a dozen 4.5 ounce jars, so adjust the recipe for the number of favors you'll need.     5. The finishing touch? Labels! For ours, we cut pieces of paper so that they covered the top of the lid and came down along the side of the jar. Personalize your label as you wish and simply glue them onto the jars.     This super tasty salt can be used as a rub, as a finishing salt, or in place of any seasoning. As long as the lid is kept on tight, it can be stored indefinitely and will be a tasty reminder of your wedding day!     Photos By: Mary Swenson
    10
  • Project By: Victoria Hudgins

    Photos By: Prokopets Studios

    Warm Fall Décor: The further we step into fall, the more we are lead towards cozy fabrics and décor that evokes warmth. Engraving wood is a perfect way to bring the feeling of fall to life in your wedding, and it's easier than you'd think!     Floral Centers & Escort Cards: Here we'll show you how to make engraved centerpieces and matching wooden escort cards.     Materials: A simple wood engraver (available for under $20 at Michaels). Wood to engrave, buy or make your own wooden boxes to hold florals Wooden seating cards (a stack of 25 is in the dollar section at JoAnn's this season... hooray!) Small floral foam to place inside your centerpiece boxes. Directions: 1. Start with a pencil and outline the number or design you would like to make. Erase any misprints until you have a good line to follow. Then, heat up your engraver until you start to see smoke!     2. Begin tracing your pencil line, or freehand engrave if you are brave. Your will need to press down quite hard to get a deep continuous line. If your line is dotty, simply go over the tracing a second time, pressing more firmly. You should get the hang of it pretty quickly.     3. Once your engraving is done, wet down the floral foam and place flowers of your choice inside each box.     Escort Card Concept: We love the idea of placing the seating cards on a chalkboard surface. Engrave a table number on each wooden tag and write in your guest's name alongside it.     Warning: this new found skill is addicting, you will soon be engraving every piece of wood you can find!     Project By: Victoria Hudgins Photos By: Prokopets Studios

     

    3

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What could be more fun than telling your friends and family that you made everything at your wedding yourself? Well, an entire Do it Yourself wedding ...

might be going a bit overboard, but Project Wedding has tons of DIY wedding ideas for you to implement for your big day.

Whether you can’t cut a straight line or you’re the next Martha Stewart, we have DIY wedding ideas for every type of bride. From DIY wedding favors to DIY wedding decorations to DIY wedding invitations, if you’re interested in doing it yourself, we can help! With so many unique images of wedding ideas we’ve found, plus all our great photos of real weddings, you’ll find the most DIY wedding ideas here.

From simple wrap and tie wedding favors to more complex origami wedding decorations – if we think you can make it, you’ll find it here. These DIY favors are guaranteed to thrill your guests without emptying your pockets. Even if you’re not very crafty, we still have some fast and easy project ideas that you might like. And if you have creative friends or relatives, chances are they will be more than happy to help you.

DIY weddings are a great way to put a personal touch on all of your wedding details. You can add your initials to your wedding favors, make a candy buffet that complements your wedding colors, or create a masterpiece that looks store bought but cost way less. Whatever your reason for wanting a Do it Yourself wedding, our articles will help make your dreams come to life.

With so many great DIY wedding ideas, all of your family, friends and honored wedding guests are guaranteed to remember how amazingly creative your wedding day was. Now go get crafty!