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DIY Wedding Ideas

  • Looking for a special way to ask your bridesmaids and maid of honor to be part of your big day? These sweet accordion gifts can be customized to your bridesmaid's personality. They "pop" open when the lid is taken off!

    Materials needed: Boxes with lids, Ribbon, Computer/Printer and assorted charms or tokens.

    Step One: Measure box and layout text accordingly in a program like Microsoft Word or Adobe Illustrator. You'll want to make each one according to your bridesmaid's interests. Print it out.

    Step Two:  After printing, cut out the strips of paper and fold them accordion style. Be sure to leave a little flap at the top to adhere the strip to the lid of the box.

    Step Three: Attach the tokens or charms by tying or gluing them to the paper then adhere the strip to the lid of the box.

    Step Four: Tie with a ribbon and voila! A special gift for your special friend.

     

    4
  • Bunting is a very cheap and easy way to add color to your celebration. Whether you are planning a bridal shower or picnic reception, these little flags provide major impact with humble materials and a little elbow grease.



    Materials: Tissue Paper, scissors, glue stick and string



    Step One: Decide how large you want each flag and then cut out several sheets at once. You'll want to cut out pieces that are double the desired flag size so that they can be folded over.


    Step Two: Once you've finished cutting you're ready to glue. With a fresh glue stick quickly swipe half the flag area. Lay string down halfway through and fold the tissue over the string. Be sure to apply glue to the middle area of the flag so that it adheres to the string. Repeat until you have enough for your event. (It can take a while to produce a lot so best to settle down in front of a movie while you work.)




    Step Three: To safely store your flags wrap them around an empty cardboard gift wrap roll or paper towel roll so they don't wrinkle.

    4
  • They are simple, adorable and illuminate each and every table at your evening event!

    Materials you'll need to Create The Punched Tins:


    Clean tin cans (both smaller and larger-sized tin cans work equally well), one for each table
    Pretty paper of your choice
    Spray paint (we used white in a satin finish to compliment the paper we chose)
    A hammer and nail
    Battery-operated tealight votives (one for the inside of each can)

     

    First, make sure the cans have been thoroughly washed and dried.  Fill each can almost completely with water, stopping about an inch from the top.  Freeze the cans until the water inside is completely frozen.

    While the cans are in the freezer, take the pretty paper you've chosen to cover your cans with and cut them into strips wide enough to cover the grooves in the middles of each can and long enough to wrap around the entire can (you'll need one strip of paper per can).  Ours were 10" long by 3" wide for the smaller cans, and 13" long by 3 3/4" wide for the larger cans.  Set aside.

    Next, you'll need to make a stencil of the table number for each can.  Each stencil will be your guide when you punch the numbers onto each can.  We printed ours out in a simple font (those with a steady hand and pretty penmanship can hand-write them, too) and trimmed them so that they were the same width as our strips of patterned paper and had enough length on each side so that they could easily be taped onto the can.

    Lay each number on top of a strip of patterned paper, making sure the number is centered both vertically and horizontally.  Using a hole punch (we used a screw punch from Martha Stewart), punch holes along the outline of each number, making holes through both strips of paper.  Voila!  You now have a stencil to follow for each can, as well as a perfectly-matched decorative paper cover.

    Once the water in each can is completely frozen, you're ready to make the holes on each one.  Place a towel on top of a hard, sturdy surface (we did ours on the floor) and, working one can at a time, remove a tin from the freezer and lie it on its side on top of the towel.  Center a stencil on the front of the can, and tape each side down so that it doesn't move.  Carefully hammer a nail partially into the first hole punched on the stencil and remove it.  (All you need to do is make a hole in the tin; there's no need to hammer the nail completely into the tin.)  Do this for each hole in your stencil.  Remove the stencil from the can when you're finished and set it aside, and move onto your next can.

    Once all of the cans have been punched, fill them with hot water to melt the ice inside and dry them completely.  Spray paint each can, including the insides; two coats of paint may be needed to achieve an even, fully-covered finish.   Let the cans dry completely.

    Cover each dry can with your pretty paper strip, making sure to line up the holes in the paper with the holes on the can.  Affix the paper to the back of can with double-sided tape.  Drop a tealight inside each can (battery-operated only, please!) and bask in the sweet ambiance you've hand-created for your guests!

    Images Courtesy: Mary Swenson

    0
  • Light up your evening wedding with romantic candle light!  We found these darling mini lanterns and couldn't resist adding a pretty ribbon and name tag to use them as escort cards.

    As each guest finds their lantern and walks to their table, your venue will be cast with a sea of gorgeous light. Double them up as favors and centerpieces too! We suggest you set your tables with larger lanterns so that when your guests set down their mini lanterns, the centerpieces will be complete and your tables will be awash with candlelight! Guests can bring the lanterns home and use them again and again.

    A few tips:

    - Make sure you use the right size candle for your lantern. If the candle is too big, the handles will heat up. Give them a test run prior to your big day.

    - Make sure your venue allows candles.

    -As always, be careful with flames. Assign a friend or helper to monitor the lanterns and candlelight.

    -Be sure to have your photographer catch the details!

    Enjoy!

     

    3
  • Guests can wave these fun wands as you and your new spouse walk down the aisle to create a gorgeous scene. We used pretty shades of peach, pink, yellow, and orange but you can match yours to your wedding decor. We suggest leaving one on each chair at the ceremony with a note to guests to wave the wands at the end of the ceremony!

     

    You will need:

    Dowels or long wooden skewers

     

    3/4 yard of ribbon in your wedding colors (we used narrow satin ribbon but seam binding ribbon is inexpensive and works great!)

    Step #1: Cut the ribbon to about 3/4 yard.

    Step #2 Tie the strands on the dowel. Use as many as you like. More ribbon offers more impact.

    Enjoy!

     

     

     

     

    1
  • Inspired by all things maritime, we wrapped straight sided cylinder vases with rope to create a unique and modern vessel for flowers, and we made simple, fun signal flags to identify tables instead of table numbers.

    The result?  A striking centerpiece that compliments a nautical-themed wedding perfectly, without being too beachy.

     

     

     

     

     

    For the vases, you'll need:

    1. Cylinder vases, one for each table (Cylinder vases come in a variety of sizes, and are readily available at craft and discount stores.  Online sources are plenty, like here. )

    2. Rope (To determine how much rope you'll need to cover each vase, take a measuring tape and twist it around the entire vase, starting at the bottom and winding your way up to the top.  And while hardware stores carry different types and sizes of rope, we used a bundle of clothesline.)

    3. Instant glue, like Super Glue or Krazy Glue

    Unwind your bundle of rope to give yourself plenty of slack to work with.  Starting at the base of the vase, put a dot of glue on the glass and affix one end of rope to the glue.  Press in place for a moment until it dries.  From that starting point, carefully wrap the rope around the diameter of the vase, making sure the rows are tight against one another.  Once you reach the top of the vase, dot the end of the rope with glue and affix it to the glass.

     

     

    For the signal flags, you'll need:

    1. Wooden sticks (available at craft stores) or long bamboo skewers (available at grocery stores)

    2. 12 by 12 inch scrapbook paper in primary colors

    3. Double-sided tape

     

    Signal flags can symbolize either letters or numbers and are mainly red, blue, white, and/or yellow.  Choose the flag you want to make for each table by referring to a maritime signal flag chart, like this one.

    We folded the scrapbook paper in half, and then cut that in half, leaving us with perfect 6 by 6 inch squares for our flags.  We slid a wooden stick inside the fold of the paper, and secured shut with double-sided tape.  Then, we cut and adhered additional paper as needed to create our finished flag.  The flag can be propped up against the vase, or stuck inside the flower arrangement.

     

     

     

    Images Courtesy: Mary Swenson

     

    0
  • Share your love of travel with your guests by using maps as an inspiration for your table setting. We were inspired by the sea blues, greens and hints of orange on a map of Sweden.



    We used the map as a placemat but you could cover the entire table, or create a runner from it as well. We chose modern silverware, glassware and dishes to contrast the busyness of the map.


    For the napkins, we folded blue and white striped kitchen towels and tied them with blue and white bakers twine.



    For favors, we covered tiny (2" wide), watertight containers with the lining of an Airmail envelope (we cut it to size). We secured it with double-sided tape.


    Each little vase was filled with 3 ranunculus and a bit of greenery. A flag, handwritten with each guest's name, was placed in each favor. The result is a bright, fresh and festive table that will encourage conversation amongst your guests!



     

    0
  • Created by: 100layercake.com/blog

    Just in time for the festive holiday season, Jillian Clark and her uber-creative team at 100 Layer Cake put together this sweet new project for us, using cupcake liners! It's crafty, cute and easy to do!

    Dressing up a holiday celebration, (or wedding, of course) is always a nice touch. For a recent Harvest Dinner we decided to resurrect those adorable coffee filter garlands that have been so popular around the web and update them with some pretty fabric accents.

    This project is super easy to make and adds such a pretty feeling to your celebration. Two 36" strands require 4 - 5 packs of baking cups, depending on how loose or tight you want your garlands to be.

     

     

     

    Tools & Materials:

    Vintage fabric (or any sort, of course) found on Etsy and Tulle.  Craft & white cupcake liners. The white liners were tea dyed to soften the color a bit. Heavy duty threading needle Twine Ribbon Glue gun

     

    How to:

    If you're going to tea dye your liners, you'll need to do that first and let them dry completely.

    While they're drying, cut your fabric and tulle into rounds using a cupcake liner as a guide. Lay out all of your liners and fabric rounds so you can arrange them in a stack in the order you like. The rest is pretty straightforward. Take a small stack and just thread your needle through the center of each piece. 

    Once you've got about 1/3 of your liners strung, space them out a bit so they're as loose or tight as you want your garland to be. Then use your glue gun to attach some of the liners to the thread. This way you can control the spacing of your liners on the garland. You'll need to let the glue dry before you continue, but luckily hot glue dries super fast. Then repeat the process until your garland is full. Finally, finish off each end of the garland with little bits of ribbon or lace. 

    Photo Courtesy: scottclarkphoto.com

     

    0
  • When it comes to addressing wedding invitations, our first choice is to hire a skilled calligrapher for the task. Unfortunately,  that isn't always in the budget. But learning some basics about calligraphy tools can help give your invitations a unique look. By using a pen with a calligraphers pointed tip, you can get the thick and thin flow that is impossible to get from just a regular pen, so even "regular" handwriting has a special look. The best part is the tools are very cheap! So round up all your friends with nice handwriting and give them a basic lesson in writing with a calligrapher's pointed nib.

     

     

    Supplies needed:

    -Speedball Oblique Copperplate Pen Holder $1.89 each
    -Pointed Nib like Gillott 404 $.76 each
    -Envelopes
    -Calligraphy Ink or Goache-watered down $8 

    First, insert the nib into the pen attachment so it is facing down at a 45 degree angle. Next, dip pen into the ink until the hole is filled in with ink (the small whole on the nib holds a reservoir of ink so you don't have to dip it as often.) The pointed tip produces very thin hairlines, but when pressure is applied to the pointed tip (pulling down) the two sides separate and ink is allowed to flow in a thick line.

     
    Important Tips:

    -Only put pressure on the pen when you are pulling it in a downward motion, the rest of the strokes should be thin hairlines (that way the nib won't catch on the paper).
    -Practice with the ink beforehand on the kind of envelope you will be using to make sure the ink sets (some envelopes are coated and repel the ink).
    -It takes some time to get used to the nib, so spend some time practicing before you begin.
    -Lighter inks and metallic inks show up best on dark envelopes.
    -If the ink is left out on the pen for more than a minute or two when it isn't in use, you'll need to wash it with water and dry it completely.
    -It is good to have a moist paper towel nearby to wipe the nib down.

     

    0
  • These gorgeous green boutonnieres could be made year round but are especially charming at a winter wedding. We gathered greens and mix and matched them for a casual, natural style. They won't wilt and their fragrance will add to the seasonal atmosphere.

     

     

    You will need:

    8-10 stems of greens (for three boutonnieres). We used cedar, boxwood, bay, rosemary, and hydrangea flowers.

    floral tape

    scissors

     

    clippers

    hot glue gun

    narrow ribbon

     

    Creating the boutonnieres:

    Rinse and dry all of the greenery.

    Pick out the stems you'd like to combine for your boutonniere and remove all the leaves below the first inch of the stem.

    Place the larger leaves, or bulkier greenery at the back, place buds and light weight greens like ivy at the front. Tape together with floral tape. 

    Try not to make this area larger than about an inch. Sometimes it is easier to tape together a few stems and then combine them together.

    Take the ribbon and wrap it neatly around where you've placed the floral tape. Fold over the raw edge of the ribbon and place a dot of hot glue underneath. Secure it to the rest of the ribbon.

    A tip: Add name tags to all of your boutonnieres and corsages. It's a little thing that cuts down on confusion and stress on the big day. Everyone will easily be able to find their flowers without the help from the bride!

     

    0
  • Looking for a special way to ask your bridesmaids and maid of honor to be part of your big day? These sweet accordion gifts can be customized to your bridesmaid's personality. They "pop" open when the lid is taken off!

    Materials needed: Boxes with lids, Ribbon, Computer/Printer and assorted charms or tokens.

    Step One: Measure box and layout text accordingly in a program like Microsoft Word or Adobe Illustrator. You'll want to make each one according to your bridesmaid's interests. Print it out.

    Step Two:  After printing, cut out the strips of paper and fold them accordion style. Be sure to leave a little flap at the top to adhere the strip to the lid of the box.

    Step Three: Attach the tokens or charms by tying or gluing them to the paper then adhere the strip to the lid of the box.

    Step Four: Tie with a ribbon and voila! A special gift for your special friend.

     

    4
  • Bunting is a very cheap and easy way to add color to your celebration. Whether you are planning a bridal shower or picnic reception, these little flags provide major impact with humble materials and a little elbow grease.



    Materials: Tissue Paper, scissors, glue stick and string



    Step One: Decide how large you want each flag and then cut out several sheets at once. You'll want to cut out pieces that are double the desired flag size so that they can be folded over.


    Step Two: Once you've finished cutting you're ready to glue. With a fresh glue stick quickly swipe half the flag area. Lay string down halfway through and fold the tissue over the string. Be sure to apply glue to the middle area of the flag so that it adheres to the string. Repeat until you have enough for your event. (It can take a while to produce a lot so best to settle down in front of a movie while you work.)




    Step Three: To safely store your flags wrap them around an empty cardboard gift wrap roll or paper towel roll so they don't wrinkle.

    4
  • They are simple, adorable and illuminate each and every table at your evening event!

    Materials you'll need to Create The Punched Tins:


    Clean tin cans (both smaller and larger-sized tin cans work equally well), one for each table
    Pretty paper of your choice
    Spray paint (we used white in a satin finish to compliment the paper we chose)
    A hammer and nail
    Battery-operated tealight votives (one for the inside of each can)

     

    First, make sure the cans have been thoroughly washed and dried.  Fill each can almost completely with water, stopping about an inch from the top.  Freeze the cans until the water inside is completely frozen.

    While the cans are in the freezer, take the pretty paper you've chosen to cover your cans with and cut them into strips wide enough to cover the grooves in the middles of each can and long enough to wrap around the entire can (you'll need one strip of paper per can).  Ours were 10" long by 3" wide for the smaller cans, and 13" long by 3 3/4" wide for the larger cans.  Set aside.

    Next, you'll need to make a stencil of the table number for each can.  Each stencil will be your guide when you punch the numbers onto each can.  We printed ours out in a simple font (those with a steady hand and pretty penmanship can hand-write them, too) and trimmed them so that they were the same width as our strips of patterned paper and had enough length on each side so that they could easily be taped onto the can.

    Lay each number on top of a strip of patterned paper, making sure the number is centered both vertically and horizontally.  Using a hole punch (we used a screw punch from Martha Stewart), punch holes along the outline of each number, making holes through both strips of paper.  Voila!  You now have a stencil to follow for each can, as well as a perfectly-matched decorative paper cover.

    Once the water in each can is completely frozen, you're ready to make the holes on each one.  Place a towel on top of a hard, sturdy surface (we did ours on the floor) and, working one can at a time, remove a tin from the freezer and lie it on its side on top of the towel.  Center a stencil on the front of the can, and tape each side down so that it doesn't move.  Carefully hammer a nail partially into the first hole punched on the stencil and remove it.  (All you need to do is make a hole in the tin; there's no need to hammer the nail completely into the tin.)  Do this for each hole in your stencil.  Remove the stencil from the can when you're finished and set it aside, and move onto your next can.

    Once all of the cans have been punched, fill them with hot water to melt the ice inside and dry them completely.  Spray paint each can, including the insides; two coats of paint may be needed to achieve an even, fully-covered finish.   Let the cans dry completely.

    Cover each dry can with your pretty paper strip, making sure to line up the holes in the paper with the holes on the can.  Affix the paper to the back of can with double-sided tape.  Drop a tealight inside each can (battery-operated only, please!) and bask in the sweet ambiance you've hand-created for your guests!

    Images Courtesy: Mary Swenson

    0
  • Light up your evening wedding with romantic candle light!  We found these darling mini lanterns and couldn't resist adding a pretty ribbon and name tag to use them as escort cards.

    As each guest finds their lantern and walks to their table, your venue will be cast with a sea of gorgeous light. Double them up as favors and centerpieces too! We suggest you set your tables with larger lanterns so that when your guests set down their mini lanterns, the centerpieces will be complete and your tables will be awash with candlelight! Guests can bring the lanterns home and use them again and again.

    A few tips:

    - Make sure you use the right size candle for your lantern. If the candle is too big, the handles will heat up. Give them a test run prior to your big day.

    - Make sure your venue allows candles.

    -As always, be careful with flames. Assign a friend or helper to monitor the lanterns and candlelight.

    -Be sure to have your photographer catch the details!

    Enjoy!

     

    3
  • Guests can wave these fun wands as you and your new spouse walk down the aisle to create a gorgeous scene. We used pretty shades of peach, pink, yellow, and orange but you can match yours to your wedding decor. We suggest leaving one on each chair at the ceremony with a note to guests to wave the wands at the end of the ceremony!

     

    You will need:

    Dowels or long wooden skewers

     

    3/4 yard of ribbon in your wedding colors (we used narrow satin ribbon but seam binding ribbon is inexpensive and works great!)

    Step #1: Cut the ribbon to about 3/4 yard.

    Step #2 Tie the strands on the dowel. Use as many as you like. More ribbon offers more impact.

    Enjoy!

     

     

     

     

    1
  • Inspired by all things maritime, we wrapped straight sided cylinder vases with rope to create a unique and modern vessel for flowers, and we made simple, fun signal flags to identify tables instead of table numbers.

    The result?  A striking centerpiece that compliments a nautical-themed wedding perfectly, without being too beachy.

     

     

     

     

     

    For the vases, you'll need:

    1. Cylinder vases, one for each table (Cylinder vases come in a variety of sizes, and are readily available at craft and discount stores.  Online sources are plenty, like here. )

    2. Rope (To determine how much rope you'll need to cover each vase, take a measuring tape and twist it around the entire vase, starting at the bottom and winding your way up to the top.  And while hardware stores carry different types and sizes of rope, we used a bundle of clothesline.)

    3. Instant glue, like Super Glue or Krazy Glue

    Unwind your bundle of rope to give yourself plenty of slack to work with.  Starting at the base of the vase, put a dot of glue on the glass and affix one end of rope to the glue.  Press in place for a moment until it dries.  From that starting point, carefully wrap the rope around the diameter of the vase, making sure the rows are tight against one another.  Once you reach the top of the vase, dot the end of the rope with glue and affix it to the glass.

     

     

    For the signal flags, you'll need:

    1. Wooden sticks (available at craft stores) or long bamboo skewers (available at grocery stores)

    2. 12 by 12 inch scrapbook paper in primary colors

    3. Double-sided tape

     

    Signal flags can symbolize either letters or numbers and are mainly red, blue, white, and/or yellow.  Choose the flag you want to make for each table by referring to a maritime signal flag chart, like this one.

    We folded the scrapbook paper in half, and then cut that in half, leaving us with perfect 6 by 6 inch squares for our flags.  We slid a wooden stick inside the fold of the paper, and secured shut with double-sided tape.  Then, we cut and adhered additional paper as needed to create our finished flag.  The flag can be propped up against the vase, or stuck inside the flower arrangement.

     

     

     

    Images Courtesy: Mary Swenson

     

    0
  • Share your love of travel with your guests by using maps as an inspiration for your table setting. We were inspired by the sea blues, greens and hints of orange on a map of Sweden.



    We used the map as a placemat but you could cover the entire table, or create a runner from it as well. We chose modern silverware, glassware and dishes to contrast the busyness of the map.


    For the napkins, we folded blue and white striped kitchen towels and tied them with blue and white bakers twine.



    For favors, we covered tiny (2" wide), watertight containers with the lining of an Airmail envelope (we cut it to size). We secured it with double-sided tape.


    Each little vase was filled with 3 ranunculus and a bit of greenery. A flag, handwritten with each guest's name, was placed in each favor. The result is a bright, fresh and festive table that will encourage conversation amongst your guests!



     

    0
  • Created by: 100layercake.com/blog

    Just in time for the festive holiday season, Jillian Clark and her uber-creative team at 100 Layer Cake put together this sweet new project for us, using cupcake liners! It's crafty, cute and easy to do!

    Dressing up a holiday celebration, (or wedding, of course) is always a nice touch. For a recent Harvest Dinner we decided to resurrect those adorable coffee filter garlands that have been so popular around the web and update them with some pretty fabric accents.

    This project is super easy to make and adds such a pretty feeling to your celebration. Two 36" strands require 4 - 5 packs of baking cups, depending on how loose or tight you want your garlands to be.

     

     

     

    Tools & Materials:

    Vintage fabric (or any sort, of course) found on Etsy and Tulle.  Craft & white cupcake liners. The white liners were tea dyed to soften the color a bit. Heavy duty threading needle Twine Ribbon Glue gun

     

    How to:

    If you're going to tea dye your liners, you'll need to do that first and let them dry completely.

    While they're drying, cut your fabric and tulle into rounds using a cupcake liner as a guide. Lay out all of your liners and fabric rounds so you can arrange them in a stack in the order you like. The rest is pretty straightforward. Take a small stack and just thread your needle through the center of each piece. 

    Once you've got about 1/3 of your liners strung, space them out a bit so they're as loose or tight as you want your garland to be. Then use your glue gun to attach some of the liners to the thread. This way you can control the spacing of your liners on the garland. You'll need to let the glue dry before you continue, but luckily hot glue dries super fast. Then repeat the process until your garland is full. Finally, finish off each end of the garland with little bits of ribbon or lace. 

    Photo Courtesy: scottclarkphoto.com

     

    0
  • When it comes to addressing wedding invitations, our first choice is to hire a skilled calligrapher for the task. Unfortunately,  that isn't always in the budget. But learning some basics about calligraphy tools can help give your invitations a unique look. By using a pen with a calligraphers pointed tip, you can get the thick and thin flow that is impossible to get from just a regular pen, so even "regular" handwriting has a special look. The best part is the tools are very cheap! So round up all your friends with nice handwriting and give them a basic lesson in writing with a calligrapher's pointed nib.

     

     

    Supplies needed:

    -Speedball Oblique Copperplate Pen Holder $1.89 each
    -Pointed Nib like Gillott 404 $.76 each
    -Envelopes
    -Calligraphy Ink or Goache-watered down $8 

    First, insert the nib into the pen attachment so it is facing down at a 45 degree angle. Next, dip pen into the ink until the hole is filled in with ink (the small whole on the nib holds a reservoir of ink so you don't have to dip it as often.) The pointed tip produces very thin hairlines, but when pressure is applied to the pointed tip (pulling down) the two sides separate and ink is allowed to flow in a thick line.

     
    Important Tips:

    -Only put pressure on the pen when you are pulling it in a downward motion, the rest of the strokes should be thin hairlines (that way the nib won't catch on the paper).
    -Practice with the ink beforehand on the kind of envelope you will be using to make sure the ink sets (some envelopes are coated and repel the ink).
    -It takes some time to get used to the nib, so spend some time practicing before you begin.
    -Lighter inks and metallic inks show up best on dark envelopes.
    -If the ink is left out on the pen for more than a minute or two when it isn't in use, you'll need to wash it with water and dry it completely.
    -It is good to have a moist paper towel nearby to wipe the nib down.

     

    0
  • These gorgeous green boutonnieres could be made year round but are especially charming at a winter wedding. We gathered greens and mix and matched them for a casual, natural style. They won't wilt and their fragrance will add to the seasonal atmosphere.

     

     

    You will need:

    8-10 stems of greens (for three boutonnieres). We used cedar, boxwood, bay, rosemary, and hydrangea flowers.

    floral tape

    scissors

     

    clippers

    hot glue gun

    narrow ribbon

     

    Creating the boutonnieres:

    Rinse and dry all of the greenery.

    Pick out the stems you'd like to combine for your boutonniere and remove all the leaves below the first inch of the stem.

    Place the larger leaves, or bulkier greenery at the back, place buds and light weight greens like ivy at the front. Tape together with floral tape. 

    Try not to make this area larger than about an inch. Sometimes it is easier to tape together a few stems and then combine them together.

    Take the ribbon and wrap it neatly around where you've placed the floral tape. Fold over the raw edge of the ribbon and place a dot of hot glue underneath. Secure it to the rest of the ribbon.

    A tip: Add name tags to all of your boutonnieres and corsages. It's a little thing that cuts down on confusion and stress on the big day. Everyone will easily be able to find their flowers without the help from the bride!

     

    0

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What could be more fun than telling your friends and family that you made everything at your wedding yourself? Well, an entire Do it Yourself wedding ...

might be going a bit overboard, but Project Wedding has tons of DIY wedding ideas for you to implement for your big day.

Whether you can’t cut a straight line or you’re the next Martha Stewart, we have DIY wedding ideas for every type of bride. From DIY wedding favors to DIY wedding decorations to DIY wedding invitations, if you’re interested in doing it yourself, we can help! With so many unique images of wedding ideas we’ve found, plus all our great photos of real weddings, you’ll find the most DIY wedding ideas here.

From simple wrap and tie wedding favors to more complex origami wedding decorations – if we think you can make it, you’ll find it here. These DIY favors are guaranteed to thrill your guests without emptying your pockets. Even if you’re not very crafty, we still have some fast and easy project ideas that you might like. And if you have creative friends or relatives, chances are they will be more than happy to help you.

DIY weddings are a great way to put a personal touch on all of your wedding details. You can add your initials to your wedding favors, make a candy buffet that complements your wedding colors, or create a masterpiece that looks store bought but cost way less. Whatever your reason for wanting a Do it Yourself wedding, our articles will help make your dreams come to life.

With so many great DIY wedding ideas, all of your family, friends and honored wedding guests are guaranteed to remember how amazingly creative your wedding day was. Now go get crafty!