mavie

WEDDING DATE:

Jun 23, 2006

mavie
  • Last updated on April 8, 2007 at 8:12 am
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How To Make Layered Wedding Program

These are instructions I made up when I saw this style of wedding program at Paper Source. It may not be the best way but it worked.

Materials: 8.5"x11" cardstock (preferrably at least 80-110lb)
8.5"x11" printer paper
8.5"x11" vellum
1/8" eyelets (alternative use cute fasteners/brads)
1/8" hole puncher
eyelet machine (if using fasteners/brads, don't need this)
paper cutter
paper scorer or letter opener


1. For the cardstock backing, cut into 4.25"x11". Then fold the flap to 1". Use a scorer to get a nicer fold.

2. To save paper, you can print twice on one sheet of vellum. Using Microsoft Word, set your page size to be 4.25"x11" and center your text/image the way you like it. Note that 1" of the top will be hidden by the cardstock fold so remember to account for this. Then print from the top left of the vellum if you're printer allows you to do this. Then rotate the paper 360 degrees and print again from the top left. Then cut vellum to 4.25"x11". I printed 1 original copy for each program page and then used a copier to print the rest. Saves ink and much faster but there will be some slight off alignment. Only I would notice... I also used grey print paper because it is easier to read out in the sunlight.

3. For the inside text, you can either make it like I did with varying lengths for each page or keep it the same length. Let me warn you if you do varying lengths, it is not that easy. For the one length page, set your page size in MS Word to be 4.25"x11" and remember to give 1" off the top. For the varying length, decide how many pages you're going to have. Give 1/2" for the titles you see. From the bottom up, subtract 1/2" for each page so you'll get the lengths for each of the pages. Then in MS Word, set your page size to each of the different page sizes. Use the printing technique mentioned in step 2. Using a paper cutter, cut each page accordingly. See pictures below.

4. The hole punching should be 1" away from the left and right and 1/2" from the top and bottom of the fold. Mark the cardstock at these positions. Using the hole puncher, punch through the two layers.

5. Assemble each page to form a program set and using the already punched holes on the cardstock as guides to punch through the rest of the sheets. I had 7 layers to punch through and it took a bit of work. My then FI did it cuz it hurt my hand to do it this way, otherwise you can take more time and hole punch one sheet at a time.

6. Use the eyelet machine to attach the eyelets to the program. If using the brads, then you don't need the machine. Just fasten the brad to the program with your hands. The eyelet machine can be expensive. I borrowed it from my cousin who does stamping.





  • Last updated on March 21, 2007 at 8:36 am
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How To Make Paper Lantern

These are instructions on how to make the paper lanterns that you see as my centerpiece. The finished product will stand 8.5" and each side is 3.5" wide.

1. Get a 26"x20" cardstock paper that you can find at craft stores near the painting section. They have a variety of colors. Usually cost $1.65 each. I always had some craft store coupon so it was like $0.85 each for me. I bought a few at a time as I get these coupons because of limit.

2. Cut the large cardstock into 8.5"x14.5". The large cardstock can yield 3 of these 8.5"x14.5". So 1 large cardstock can make 3 lanterns. Use the 26" side to measure out three 8.5" and use the 20" side to measure out the 14.5".

3. For each of the 8.5"x14.5" sheets, follow the template below. The template is not to scale but is to show you where to cut and fold. I used an exacto knife, ruler, and a cutting board to acurately cut lantern. I used a letter opener and ruler to help score the fold. Make sure the letter opener is not too sharp, otherwise you'll end up cutting the paper instead of scoring. There are actual scoring tools but why spend extra money when a letter opener will do?

4. For the white panels on the lantern, I printed the text on regular sized paper (67lb paper thickness) and then cut it into 3"x7". I had to play around with the printer to get it printed on the furthest left of the paper so that I can save paper and print 2 on 1 sheet but I have to print separately each time. I used Microsoft Word and created a page sized to 3"x7" so the text will be centered nicely. I inserted a double happiness and love symbol picture as well. Each printer is different but mine was able to indicate to print from the top left. That way, I have an edge to start measuring and cutting paper to 3"x7". Some printers might just print from the middle which will make it more difficult to measure. Get a paper cutter to do this. Those craft store coupons come in handy again.

5. After you have the lantern cutout and the text paper, adhere them together with double sided tape. This is the easiest and least messy way to attach.

6. Now assemble the lantern together by folding up the sides. Tuck and tape in the last 1/2".

Once you get everything in line, it's just like an assembly line....repetitive actions. I created the lantern part first. I waited till the last minute to do the text part because I didn't have the final guest list until the week of my wedding. However, I designed the text and made sure I had the printing correct ahead of time. All I needed to do was type in the names, print, and cut. If you get 2-3 people working on this, it will be fast.

I would suggest making one in its entirety and see if that is something you think you would want to do for another X number of times. I liked designing the lantern but it did get tedious mass producing them. Making the wedding programs was even more tedious!



Paper Lantern In Progress

  • Last updated on March 15, 2007 at 11:27 am
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We got married on one of the hottest days of June in 2006, but we still had a beautiful outdoor winery wedding. Although the wedding was held at a winery, our wedding theme was minimalistic Asian inspired.

If you have any questions, you can toast me or you can email me maviepoo at yahoo period com

Please don't borrow pictures without asking for permission.